Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Role Concept in Software Development

Sandra Frings,Dr. Anette Weisbecker
Fraunhofer Institut fuer Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation


1
Introduction

In software-development the use of new technologies on one hand opens new perspectives for software applications and the support of business processes. On the other hand it implies a modification of the requirements toward software engineering. Trying out and using new technologies calls for new activities in software development and requires new or different qualities of an employee.

Having these facts in mind the project PROMPT (Organisational composition formation and methods for software development processes) was funded by the German Department for Education (BMBF) in which a role concept was developed ( Weisbecker and Groh 1998).


2
The role concept

In the role concept a role is defined by the necessary experience, knowledge and abilities which are needed to fulfil the tasks and activities asked for in the specific role. The actual person filling the role is called the role bearer. One person can fill one role, or even more roles. But the tasks of one role can also be spread among more persons depending on the size and complexity of the project or the available resources.

This concept describes the interplay between all roles in software engineering and states a method for defining, detecting and integrating roles into the whole software development cycle. Consequently a company specific approach in the development of a role concept is to be followed. This approach includes the integration of roles into the software development process model and the management aspects of software projects (e.g. setting up project teams and human project resource estimation). Furthermore the approach includes the integration of roles into the qualification concept for software engineering. The

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