Environmental Injustice in the United States: Myths and Realities

By James P. Lester; David W. Allen et al. | Go to book overview

Index
Achen, Christopher, 72
African Americans. See Black population
Afton, 9, 27
Agenda setting
business perspectives, 29
conclusions, 51-52
defining environmental justice, 29-31
grassroots environmental justice, 28-29
inequity recognition, 25-28
introduction, 21-22
model and methods of analysis, 22-24
policy stream. See Policy stream
political stream. See Political stream
problem stream. See Problem stream
Air pollution
adjusted state level variables, 107n-108n
city-level, 140-144
county-level, 122-124, 126-127, 130
fugitive air toxic releases, 120, 123-124, 127, 141-144
Hispanic population, 93, 94, 152
lead TRI releases, 144-145
stack air toxic releases, 120, 123, 125, 127, 141-143
state-level, 79, 81, 82, 92-96, 105
Toxic Release Inventory (TRI). See Toxic Release Inventory (TRI)
Alabama, 165
Alliance for Superfund Action Partnership (ASAP), 40
American political culture, 68-69
Anderton, D.L., 64
Antecedent variables, 24
Arkansas, 165
Arora, S., 61
Asian Pacific Islanders, 59
Bad air days, 79
Bean v. Southwestern Waste Management Corporation, 26
Been, Vicki, 49
Big 10 mainstream organizations, 44-45
Birth defects, 83, 85, 90, 91, 98
Black population
air pollution, 93, 94
city-level analysis, 136-146
complex model of state-level environmental harms, 92-106
county-level analysis, 119-125
examples of ecoracism, 9
Morrisonville, 29
multilevel analyses findings, 150, 152-154
origins of environmental justice movement, 25
ozone depletion, 93
political mobilization, 4-5, 149-151
simple tripartite model testing, 87-90, 118-121
solid waste, 98

-205-

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Environmental Injustice in the United States: Myths and Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Dedications v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Introduction the Nature of the Problem 1
  • Notes 7
  • 2 - Environmental Injustice Research: Reviewing the Evidence 9
  • Notes 18
  • 3 - Environmental Justice: Getting on the Public Agenda 21
  • Summary and Conclusions 51
  • Notes 52
  • 4 - Modeling Environmental Injustice: Concepts, Measures, Hypotheses, and Method of Analysis 57
  • Summary 73
  • Notes 74
  • 5 - Environmental Injustice in America's States 79
  • Notes 106
  • 6 - Environmental Injustice in America's Counties 113
  • Conclusion 129
  • Notes 131
  • 7 - Environmental Injustice in America's Cities 133
  • Conclusion 144
  • Notes 147
  • 8 - Summary and Conclusions from the Multilevel Analyses 149
  • Conclusion 156
  • Note 157
  • 9 - Existing Federal and State Policies for Environmental Justice: Problems and Prospects 159
  • Summary and Conclusion 171
  • Summary and Conclusion 171
  • 10 - Designing an Effective Policy for Environmental Justice: Implications and Recommendations 173
  • Conclusion 187
  • Notes 188
  • References 189
  • About the Authors 203
  • Index 205
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