America's Failure in China, 1941-50

By Tang Tsou | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

One great joy in completing a piece of work comes from acknowledging the help graciously given during the uncertain period of essaying the task. This book had its origins in Professor Hans J. Morgenthau's desire to have someone examine the various controversial issues arising out of the wartime and postwar policy of the United States toward China. His concern with concepts and assumptions underlying political action and his profound insight into the intricate interplay of ideas and interests have given this study its general character. Without his guidance, tolerance, and patience, this book would never have been completed. From Robert E. Osgood, I first learned the spirit and the fundamentals of American foreign policy by probing his mind in informal chats within the confining walls of a shared office. His judicious views, conveyed in his extensive and detailed comments on the manuscript, helped me toward a balanced perspective. Dr. Allen S. Whiting read the whole manuscript and his suggestions have led to many improvements. To him, I owe the title of the book. In letters and extensive comments on the manuscript, Mr. Riley Sunderland was kind enough to put at my disposal his detailed knowledge of American military history and allowed me to draw on his penetrating insight into the complex events during the Pacific war. He has become the silent partner in many phases of this intellectual enterprise. The comments of Professor Paul Clyde of Duke University on the first part of an earlier draft alerted me to the importance of a proper blending of analysis and narrative. Professor Knight Biggerstaff of Cornell read the chapters on Hurley and Marshall and gave me the benefit of his vast scholarship and his personal knowledge of the period. Professor John K. Fairbank read the book in galleys and has given me much encouragement and help through the years. I am indebted to Professor Walter Johnson, Professor Herman Finer, Dr. Charles M. Hardin, Mr. Robert Goldwin, and Mrs. David Easton for their perceptive comments on parts of the manuscript. Professor Louis Hartz of Harvard University and Professors Daniel J. Boorstin, Leo Strauss, and Joseph Cropsey of the University of Chicago brought their knowledge of political thought to bear in their comments on an article on the American political tradition and the American image of Chinese communism, published in the December, 1962, issue of the Political Science Quarterly, parts of which are incorporated in this book. Mr. John Carter Vincent's two letters commenting on my article on Marshall's China policy, published in the Spring,

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America's Failure in China, 1941-50
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 614

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.