Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview

From John Parke Custis

My Dear Mama, Kings-College 1 July 5th (1773)

I have at length the Pleasure of informing you that I am settled in every respect according to my Satisfaction. 2 There has Nothing been omitted by the Professors, which could be in any means condusive to my Happiness, & contentment during my residence at this place, and I believe I may say without vanity that I am looked upon in a particular Light by Them all, there is as much distinction made between me & the other students as can be expected. I dine with them (a liberty that is not allow'd any but myself) associate & pertake of all their recreations, their Attention to my Education keeps pace with their other good offices, and from their Words as well as Actions. I have reason to form the most pleasing Hope of Pleasure & Satisfaction entertainment in the pursit of my Studies. It does not become me to Speak much in praise of my own attendance but I assure you that I have done as much or more in 2 months than in the eight Months before, and I flatter myself you will never hear anything but what is agreable from Doctor Cooper3 or any other of the Professors. It is now time to give you short plan of my apartments, and of my way of living. I have a large parlour with two Studyes or closets, each large enough to contain a bed, trunk and couple of chairs, one I sleep in, & the other Joe 4 calls his, my chamber and parlour are paper'd with a cheap tho very pretty Paper, the other is painted; my furniture consists of Six chairs, 2 Tables, with a few paultry Pictures; I have an excellent Bed, and in short every thing very convenient & clever. I generally get up about Six or a little after, dress myself & go to chappel, by the time that Prayers are over Joe has me a little Breakfast to which I sit down very contented after eating heartyly. I thank God, and go to my Studys, with which I am employed till twelve than I take a walk and return about one dine with the professors, & after dinner study till Six at which time the Bell always rings for Prayers they being over college is broak up, and then we take what Amusement we please.

Things My dear Mother were going on in this agreable Manner, till last Thursday, the day I receiv'd Pappa's melancholy Letter, 5 giveing an account of my dear & only Sister's Death. I myself met the Post, & brought the sad Epistle to Doctor Cooper who I beg'd to open his Letter immediately, the Direction I did not know, but the Seal 6 I knew too well to be deceived. My confusion & uneasiness on this occasion is better conceiv'd that expresst. Her case is more to be envied than pitied, for if we mortals can distinguish between those who are deserveing of grace & who are not, I am confident she enjoys that Bliss prepar'd only for the good & virtuous, let these considerations, My dear Mother have their due weight with you and comfort yourself with reflecting that she now enjoys

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