Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview

To Mercy Otis Warren

Cambridge, January the 8th 1776

Mrs. Washington presents her respectfull compliments to Mrs Warren, 1 and thanks her most cordially for her polite enquire, and exceeding kind offer - If the Exigency of affairs in this camp should make it necessary for her to remove, she cannot but esteem it a happiness to have so friendly an Invitation as Mrs Warren has given. 2 In the meanwhile, Mrs Washington cannot help wishing for an oppertunity of shewing every civility in her power to Mrs Warren, at Head Quarters in Cambridge -

The General begs that his best regards may be presented to Mrs Warren, accompanied with his sincear thanks for her favourable wishes for his honour and success; and joins in wishing Mrs Warren - the speaker 3 - and thair Family, every happiness that is, or can be derived from a speedy, and honourable peace

(address leaf)
To Mrs. Warren
at
Plymouth
(Docket)
Mrs Washington
Cambridge 8th Jany
1776

ALS (3rd person) MHi.

1.
Mercy Otis Warren ( 1728-1814) was the wife of James Warren (see infra) and sister of the patriot-orator, James Otis. She was an historian, playwrite, poetess, and feminist. One of her most notable works was a history of the American Revolution. She carried on an extensive correspondence with many of the literary and political figures of her day.
2.
The unsettled affairs at the Camp, occasioned by the formation of a new army to replace the one decimated by the expiration of enlistments, and the threat of British attack, prompted Mrs. Warren to invite Mrs. Washington to her home where she would be farther removed from danger.
3.
James Warren ( 1726-1808) was a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, and after the death of Dr. Joseph Warren at Bunker Hill, its President. Later he served as Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. During the Revolution he was paymaster of the Continental Army from 1776 until 1781.

To Anna Maria Bassett

My Dear Sister Cambridge January the 31, 1776

I have wrote to you several times in hopes that would put you in mind of me but I find it has not had its intended affect and I am really very uneasy at not hearing from you and have made all the excuses for you that I can think of but it will not doe much longer if I doe not get a

-166-

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