Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview
Monmouth. From 1778 until 1781 he was President of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania.
2.
Charles Pettit ( 1736-1806) was a Philadelphia merchant. He was assistant quartermaster- general of the Continental Army from 1778 until 1781, and a member of the Continental Congress. He was a brother-in-law of Joseph Reed. See, supra, n. 1.

To Anna Maria Dandridge Bassett

November the 18th 1777

My Dear Sister

I have the very great pleasure of returning, - you your Boys 1 as well as they were when I brought them from Eitham - They have had the small pox exeeding light and have been perfectly well this fortnight past - Mr. Claiborne 2 came up with us and had the small as light as they had, he has been here ever since I came up - his going down determined me to send your sons with him as I think he will be a guide to them on the road and better than they should goe so far by themselves, they have been exeeding good Boys indeed and I shall hope you will lett them come to see me when ever they can spare so much time from school - they have been such good Boy that I shall love them a great deal more than I ever did - I have paid the Doctors £ 9 for them. - and £ 8 for two Hatts (?) which could not be got for less (?) 9/9

I have given to Mr. Claiborne to bare thare expens down - and five seven Dollar Bills I inclose in this letter which is all that is owed - the Doctor's charge is very high but I did not say a word - as he carred the children so well through the small pox -

The last letter I had from the General was dated the 7th of this month - he says he says nothing hath happend since the unsuccessful attack upon our forts on the Dalaware, - the Boys bring the last papers down with them -

Nelly Custis has be over the river this three week - Jack is just come over, he tells me that little Bet is grown as fat as a pigg - Nelly is not well her self -

I was glad to hear that you had got the horse and hope you have before this found great benefet from riding everyday - I have often wished for my dear sister and Fanny, as the small pox was so trifleing with the Boys - believed that it would have been as slight with them I have had all thare cloths washed and rinsed several days - and do veryly believe that they can bring no infection home with them - if you are afraide lett some one who has had the small pox put out thare cloths to air for a day or two in the sun - an Thomas has also been washed and his cloths changed - his cap & shoes he did not ware, when he was sick - I shall be glad you will let me know how the Boys gett down - by Peter who set off today with Jacks mares & colts to carry them down to his quarter in New Kent -

-174-

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