Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview
8.
John Parke Custis was elected as a delegate from Fairfax County to the Virginia General Assembly. Ms fellow delegate was George Mason. The sessions were from May 4 - June 1, 1778, and from October 5 - December 19, 1788. See, The General Assembly of Virginia, 1619-1978. A Bicentennial Register of Members, Virginia State Library, Richmond, 1978., p. 129.
9.
Caleb Gibbs ( 1748-1818) served as adjutant of the 21st and 14th regiments of the Continental Infantry. He was appointed captain in command of General Washington's guard, March 12, 1776 and aide and secretary to the General on May 16, 1776. Obviously Custis met him while staying at headquarters in Cambridge during the winter of 1775-76.
10.
Richard Kidder Meade ( 1746-1805), a native of Nansemond County, Virginia, joined the patriot cause at the very beginning of the conflict. He served with the General throughout all his campaigns and was appointed aide on January 12, 1777. He may have known Custis in Virginia. He was the father of Bishop William Meade, third Episcopal bishop of Virginia.
11.
Dr. James Craik ( 1730-1814), a native of Scotland, served with the General at the Great Meadows in 1754 and at Braddock's defeat in 1755. He served throughout the Revolution in various medical capacities. When war with France was threatened in 1798 General Washington insisted Craik be appointed Physician-general. He was a long-time intimate friend and companion in arms of the General. It is the editor's opinion that no one except Mrs. Washington knew him better. Craik was one of the physicians who attended GW during his final illness.
12.
Unidentified.
13.
The letter has not survived.

To Bartholomew Dandridge

November the 2d 17781

Dear Brother

I received your kind favor by Mr. Posey2 and should have wrote to you long before this but have everyday expected everyday Jack would be ready to set out, I am very sorry to hear that my Mamma has been so unwell and thank god that she has recovered again -- I wish I was near enough to come to see you and her. 3 I am very uneasy at this time - I have some reason to expect that I shall take another trip to the northward. 4 The pore General is not likely to come to see us from what I can hear - I expect to hear seertainly by the next post - if I doe I shall write to you to inform you and my friends-if I am so happy to stay at home. I shall hope to see you with my sister hear as soon as you are at leasure. Please to give little Patty a Kiss for me I have sent her a pair of shoes-there was not a Doll to be got in the city of Philadelphia or I would have sent her one (the shoes are in a bundle for my mama).

I am very glad to hear that you and your family are well - Jack can tell you more news than I can. I have had no letter since he came from the camp - by some (illegible) of the postmasters my letters doe (not) come regularly to hand.

I am with my Duty to my mamma my Love to my sister Aylett, 5 my sister 6 and Family my Dear Brother

Your ever affectionate
Martha Washington

-180-

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