Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview

To Fanny Bassett Washington

( July 1789)

......I wish you to take a prayer book yourself and give one to Hariot the other two to be given to Betty & Patty Custis -

I am pleased to hear that the domestic concerns goe on well - sickness is to be expected and Charlot will lay herself up for as little as any one will - it was right to give them more thread if I did not put enough in each bundle - I am truly sorry to hear of another death in the family so soon 1-

I shall think myself much obliged to Mrs Bassett2 for any particular notice she may take of Patty Dandridge - I have a great regard for her and wish her to do well - When you write to your Brother remember me affectionately to them - I was very sorry that I was obliged to leave home so soon after they came to Mount Vernon - My dear Fanny remember me to all enquiring friends to Mr & Mrs L. Washington - 3 the Major and give sweet little Maria a thousand kisses for me - I often think of the dear little engaging child - and wish her with me to hear her little prattle - we shall get the letters for her before she will want them.

ALS. Text from Private Affairs, p. 41-42.

1.
Probably the death of one of the slaves. The Washingtons often referred to their slaves and servants as part of the Mount Vernon "family,"
2.
Mrs. Burwell Bassett, II, Elizabeth, the daughter of Daniel McCarty of Pope's Creek, Westmoreland County.
3.
Lund and Elizabeth Foote Washington of "Hayfield," Fairfax County.

To Fanny Bassett Washington

(Summer 1789)

Nelly shall begin Musick next week 1 - she has made two or three attempts to write you; but has never finished a letter - she is a little wild creature and spends her time at the window looking at carriages &c passing by which is new to her and very common for children to do.

ALS. Text from Private Affairs, p. 20.

1.
See, accounts kept by Tobias Lear, October 16, 1789: By Cont'g't Exps. pd Mr. Reinagle for teaching Miss Custis Music & furnishing books 17-0-0; May 15, 1792 "Contingt Expenses pd A. Reinagle for four months tuition of Miss Custis & for Music for her 62 - 20." Private Affairs, 33, 76-77, 259. During the second year of his marriage, GW purchased a spinet for Patcy ( Martha Parke Custis). After her death in 1774 it apparently remained at Mount Vernon. Many years later it may have been used by her niece, Eleanor Parke Custis. By 1793 she had become proficient enough that the President felt warranted in purchasing a harpsichord for her. It was moved from Philadelphia to Mount Vernon at the termination of his presidency. Ultimately it was taken to Woodlawn Plantation after her marriage to Lawrence Lewis. It was later returned to Mount Vernon by one of her descendants, where it remains. Mrs. Washington was a strict disciplinarian with regard to "practice time," and insisted on four or five hours of practice each day. Nelly rebelled and cried bitterly, but to no avail. See, infra, Martha Washington to Eleanor Parke Custis, February 25, 1797.

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.