Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview

It is unnecessary I conceive to detail them if I had leisure, which in truth is not the case. I am - Dear Sir 1

Your Most Obedt. Hble
Servt
G˚: Washington

My opinion coincides with the above, and I advise the adoption of the measure accordingly.

Martha Washington

ALS, ViMtV.

1.
John Parke Custis had purchased the Abingdon tract from Robert Alexander in 1778 at a price the General considered excessive. After Custis's death in 1781, his uncle, Bartholomew Dandridge, became executor of the estate. At Dandridge's death in 1785, Dr. David Stuart, who had married Custis's widow, Eleanor, was named executor. After several years of negotiations over the remuneration to Alexander, a compromise was reached. Alexander would take back the land in return for a fair rent for the years it had been out of his possession. During these years the Custis-Stuarts had been living at Abingdon. After repossession by Alexander they moved to Hope Park, about five miles from Fairfax Courthouse.

To Mrs. Abigail Smith Adams

( October 1789)

Mrs Washington presents her compliments to Mrs Adams and family and requests the pleasure of their company today to dinner & if agreeable will in the evening accompany her to the concert. 1

LB ViMtV.

1.
A heavily corrected draft, superimposed upon the draft of the letter from Robert Lewis, the President's nephew and secretary, to Mrs. Ann Willis of Willis Hall, Fredericksburg, Virginia, thanking her for the honey sent the Washingtons. See supra, Ann Willis to the Washingtons, September 18, 1789. Lewis wrote the acknowledgment in the absence of the President, who had just left New York on his New England tour, October 15, 1789. See Diaries, 5:340.

To Fanny Bassett Washington

My dear Fanny New York October the 23d 1789

I have by Mrs Sims1 sent you a watch it is one of the cargoe that I have so long mentioned to you, that was expected, I hope is such a one as will please you - it is of the newest fashon, if that has any influence on your tast - The chain is of Mr Lears2 choosing and such as Mrs Adams the vice Presidents 3 Lady and those in the polite circle wares. It will last as long as the fashon - and by that time you can get another of a fashonable kind - I send to dear Maria 4 a piece of Chino to make her a frock - the piece of muslin I hope is long enough for an apron for you, and in exchange

-219-

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