Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview

In this occassion Madame, I feel the graet advantage of indolging myself, informe the Ladyes of the high end Eminent perfact Estine end Respects

Madame
Your Most Obb end
most Humb Serv
J: Ceracchi 1

Amsterdam 16 july 1792
(Docket)
From M. Caracchi
to Mrs Washington
16 July 1792

ALS, DLC:GW.

1.
Giuseppe Ceracchi ( 1760-1802) a native of Corsica and pupil of Canova, the noted sculptor, came to America in 1791 in order to persuade Congress to erect a colossal monument to commemorate the American Revolution. Washington's likeness was to play a prominent part in the design. The idea, while laudable, was abandoned because of the expense. Ceracchi made several busts of Washington. One was purchased by Congress, but was destroyed in the fire that consumed the Library of Congress in 1851. Another was presented to the Spanish ambassador and eventually found its way to America. It is now in the Corcoran Gallery in Washington. Another was retained by the artist, to be used as a model. This might have been the one offered to Mrs. Washington. See n. infra. Ceracchi returned to Europe and was a conspirator in a plot to assassinate Napoleon in 1801. He was guillotined in 1802. See, Johnson, Original Portraits of Washington, p. 170-71, ( Boston, 1882).

From John Lamb

Honored Madam, New York 30th November 1792

Enclosed is William Watson, receipt, for the delivery of two Barrels Apples, and one Barrel Nuts, - which, I have put on board the Schooner Dolphin; and I have to beg your acceptance, of the same. - Be pleased, to make my best wishes acceptable, to his Excellency, the President. and permit me to subscribe myself.

With the highest respect,
Honored Madam
Your most obedient
and very humble Servant
John Lamb

The Honorable
Mrs. Washington
(Docket)

-240-

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