Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview

(Docketed) Mrs Washington Note

AN (Third person), CSmH.

1.
Alice Delancy Izard, wife of Ralph Izard, Senator from South Carolina.

To Elizabeth Willing Powel

(N.p., N.d.)

General & Mrs Washington present their compliments to Mr and Mrs Powel, and are very much obliged to them for their kind invitation to a tea party tomorrow - but the General dining out - Mrs Washington engaged (on Wednesday last) Mrs Debert1 & Miss Reed2 to take a family Dinner and spend the day with her tomorrow - Expecting to be along - which will put it out of her power to wait upon Mrs Powel as she otherwise would have done with pleasure

(Address) Mrs Powel

ALS (Third person), ViMtV.

1.
Miss or Mrs Debert. Unidentified.
2.
Miss Reed. Unidentified.

To Mr and Mrs Samuel Powel

The President and Mrs Washington present their complimts to Mr & Mrs Powell and (agreeably to Mrs Powells request) have the honor to inform them that Mrs Washington is so much indisposed with a cold as to make her fear encreasing it by going to the Circus this afternoon - The President & rest of her family propose to be Spectators at the exhibition of Mr. Rickets 1

Wednesday 24th Aprl Mr & Mrs Powell 1793

AL (Third person). In the handwriting of George Washington. ViMtV

1.
John Bill Ricketts, an English equestrian, first came to Philadelphia in 1792, where he opened in America. In 1793, at the corner of 12th and Market Streets, he built a large circular wooden building, capped by a conical roof. The building was ninety-seven feet in diameter, contained a center stage and seated 700 people. The performance consisted of tight-rope and slack-wire walking, clowns, and trick equestrian riding. Speight, A Hirtory of the Circus, London, 1980, p. 112-15.

-248-

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