Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview
Save to active project

To Fanny Bassett Washington

Philadelphia June 30th 1794

My Dear Fanny

I am very glad to hear by your letter of the 23d that your children were all well - we have had rain almost every day these ten days, - The damp is very great hear Many people are complaining of tooth acks and swilled faces and violent colds Thank god we are tolarable well - Nelly has had the tooth ack which she is very subject to She has got better but it will return when she gets cold - She will not be perswaded to take care of herself - she is a pore thoughtless child -

I have been so unhappy about the Presidt that I did not know what to do with myself -he tells me in his letter of Wednesday that he is better, 1- I hope in god that he is so - if I could have come down with any conveniance - I should have set out the very hour I got the letter I hope and trust he is better and that he will soon be able to return hear again if he is not getting better my dear Fanny dont let me be deceved let me know his case and not say he is getting better if he is not - it would make me exceeding unhappy to be told or made to believe he is getting better if he is not - I besech you to let me now how he is as soon as you can and often, - if he is likely to be confined at mount vernon longer than was expected I will get into the stage or get stage horses and come down emidately to you, - I very sincearly wish you may find the House in town as agreable as you wish - in every stage of our life we find trouble wheather you will find more in house keeping than living in any other way must be left to time as you cannot judge befour you try which will be the most agreable to you - Maria and Fayette are boath old enough to go to school 2 - my love to the children in which Nelly and Washington join me that you may enjoy every happyness is the sincear wish of you ever affectionate

M Washington

ALS. Courtesy of Forest Lawn Memorial - Park and Mortuary, Glendale, California.

1.
While riding horseback to the falls and locks of the Potomac on Sunday, June 22nd, his horse stumbled on the rocks. To avoid a fall of the horse and himself onto the rocks, he suffered a severe strain of the muscles of his back. GW to Henry Knox, June 25, 1794. Writings, 33:411.
2.
Anna Maria Washington and her brother, George Fayette Washington. They were the children of Fanny Bassett Washington and her deceased husband, George Augustine Washington.

-270-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.