Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview

ALS, ViMtV.

1.
Ann Calvert Stuart ( 1784-) was the eldest child of Dr. David Stuart and Eleanor Calvert Custis Stuart. She was a half sister of Eleanor Parke Custis.
2.
Eleanor Calvert Custis Stuart ( 1754-1811), was the eldest daughter of Benedict (Swingate) Calvert of Mount Airy, Prince George County Maryland, the illegitimate son of Charles Calvert, fifth Lord Baltimore. Benedict Calvert married Elizabeth Calvert, daughter of Charles Calvert, r. Their daughter, Eleanor Calvert, married John Parke Custis on February 3, 1774. Widowed in 1781, she married Dr. David Stuart late in 1783.
3.
Eliza Parke Custis ( 1776-1832), married Thomas Law, a native of England and nephew of Lord Ellenborough. They separated after several years of marriage. Martha Parke Custis ( 1777-1854), married T homas Peter of Georgetown. George Washington Parke Custis ( 1781-1857), married Mary Lee Fitzhugh. They resided at "Arlington."
4.
Probably Mary Nichols, wife of James Bruce Nichols of Fairfax County. They were frequent dinner guests at Mount Vernon after the Revolution. Diaries, 6:249,263,287-88,317, 336.
5.
Probably Eliza Parke Custis.
6.
Mary Chew Bordley, wife of John Beale Bordley, see infra. Elizabeth Bordley, daughter of John Beale and Elizabeth Chew Bordley. She was a friend and confidante of Eleanor Parke Custis. Their extensive correspondence is preserved at Mount Vernon. She later married James Gibson.
7.
John Beale Bordley (1727-1804) of Baltimore and Wye Island, Maryland. He was a lawyer and jurist and noteworthy as an experimental agriculturist. He had an abiding interest in all things concerning agriculture, which brought him into friendly contact with GW. Diaries, 3:307; 5:390. Writings; 30:47-52.
8
Probably Maria Morris ( 1779-1852), daughter of Robert Morris and his wife, Mary White Morris. Diaires; 5:326.
9.
Elizabeth Temple, daughter of Sir William Temple and his wife, who was the daughter of Governor James Bowdoin of Massachusetts. Temple was a native of Boston and was the British Consul-General. He had inherited his title from his great-grandfather. Elizabeth Temple lived with the Bowdoins during the Revolution. There she met Franklin, Lafayette, Chastellux, and other distinguished personages. Chastellux described her as, "an angel in the guise of a young girl," which differs somewhat from MW's impression. R. W. Griswold, The Republican Court or American Society in the Days of Washington, ( New York, 1856), p. 9-10, 94.
10.
The drawing has not been identified.

To Eleanor Parke Custis

Mr Dear Child January the 14th 1796

hearing of an oppertunity late Last night - to send the trunk to your sister Peter I have put into it everything that you have asked for, and every thing I promised you, when I send the Picture which I hope to have ready to send by Mrs Bassett1 with two pocket handkerchiefs which will make six - I sent four with the paper - for you and cannot help reminding you that it is necessary for you to be carefull of all your cloths - and have them kept togather and often look over them - the President and your Brother are well and send love to you - I am my Dear Nelly your ever affectionate

M Washington

-290-

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