Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview
Mary and Martha, p. 324-26. Lossing states the letter was sent to "a kinswoman in New Kent," and that he obtained the text from the letter at Arlington House. The letter seems consistent with the facts.

To Mary White Morris

Septr 21st 1799

Our Dear Madam, 1 Mount Vernon

We never learnt with certainty, until we had the pleasure of seeing Mr. White2 (since his return from Frederick) that you were in Winchester.

We hope it is unnecessary to repeat in this place, how happy we should be to see you and Miss Morris under our roof, and for as long a stay as you shall find convenient, before you return to Philadelphia; for be assured we ever have, and still do retain, the most Affectionate regard for you Mr Morris3 and the family. -

With the highest esteem & regard, and best wishes for the health & happiness of the family you are in we are

Dear Madam
Your Most Obedt and
Very Humble Servants
GO: Washington
Martha Washington

LS. (Letter in the handwriting of GW) NhD.

1.
Mary White Morris, wife of Robert Morris. See supra.
2.
Alexander White ( 1738-1804), lawyer, member of the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Virginia General Assembly. He was a staunch Federalist and supported ratification of the Constitution. Under the new government he served in the 1st and 2nd Congress. From 1795-1802 he was on the commission to lay out the City of Washington. White was a native of Frederick County and lived near Winchester. He was a frequent visitor at Mount Vernon. He was present on September 21st and left on September 23rd. Diaries, 6:366.
3.
Robert Morris, financier of the Revolution, and now in serious financial straits due to excessive speculation.

-322-

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