Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview

from Colo. Pickering 17th March 1800

ALS, ViMtV.

1.
Fisher Ames ( 1758-1808), a native of Massachusetts, was a brilliant intellectual and as an orator comparable to Patrick Henry and Henry Clay. He worked diligently for ratification of the Federal Constitution in Masssachusetts and was a member of the first four Congresses. As a militant Federalist he was a staunch supporter of Hamilton and his policies. His speech before Congress in support of the Jay Treaty remains one of the greatest ever delivered before that body. The oration referred to was: An Oration on the Sublime Virtues of General George Washington, pronounced at the Old South Meeting House in Boston, Before His Honor the Lieutenant Governor, the Council, and the Two Branches of the Legislature of Massachusetts, At Their Request, ----8th of February, 1800, By Fisher Ames. Boston: 1800.
2.
Timothy Pickering ( 1745-1829) served in the Continental Army. He rose to the rank of adjutant-general and later quartermaster-general. During the Washington administration he served a brief term as postmaster-general and in 1795 became secretary of war. Later in the year he succeeded Edmund Randolph as secretary of state. As an ardent Federalist he was an admirer of Washington, a loyal supporter of Hamilton, but became a political enemy of John Adams.

From Theodore Foster

Much respected Madam Philadelphia, March 18t 1800

In condoling with you sincerely on account of the Death of the great and excellent General Washington, the Boast and the Glory of our Country, I do no more than is done by every just Citizen, and by the World at large. - Silence therefore, expressive, on this very mournful Occasion, would have best become Me, had not my Friend Doct William Rogers1 requested Me to forward the inclosed Pamphlet, containing a Copy of the Religious Exercises, at the Time of the Eulogy, at the German reformd Church, in this City 2 on the 22d Ulto. - The Universal Condolence of the Nation, so sincerely felt and manifested, indicates the highest public Esteem and Gratitude for your late Husband, who reigned in the Hearts, and possessed in a Manner unparellelled the Affections of a great and numerous People. The public Testimonials of Respect for his Memory, and the general Solicitude for the Happiness of yourself and Connexions must afford you some Consolation in the Scene of Affliction you experience, especially when it is considered that this Respect for him and his immediate Connexion, is not a Temporary thing, - That it will go down the long Stream of Time, with increasing Veneration, to the latest Ages of Posterity. For he was so universally belovd that his Eulogy is now and will continue to be a delightful Theme, for the good, the Sentimental and the ingenious in all future Time. That Almighty God may preserve you, in Health, console you by the Supporting Influence of his Spirit, and bestow on you all possible Happiness is the sincere Prayer of

Madam,
Your respectful and

-365-

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