Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview
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29 Parliament Street, 2d June 1800 Ansd. by T. Lear Feby 23, 1802

Text taken from a typescript in the Library of Congress, furnished them by Eugene E. Prussing. Location of original unknown.

1.
The volume sent Mrs. Washington was probably: Letters from his Excellency George Washington, President of the United States of America, to Sir John Sinclair, Bart. M.P. on agricultural and other intersting Topics. Engraved from the original Letters, so as to be an exact facsimile of the Hand Writing of that celebrated Character. London: the Letter-press by W. Bulmer and Co.; the Letters engraved by S. J. Neale; and the Work Sold, by G. and W. Nicol. 1800. 57:4 to. See Catalogue of the Washington Collection in the Boston Athenaeum, A. P.C. Griffin and W. C. Lane, Boston, 1897, p. 299.
2.
Sir. John Sinclair, Baron Caithness ( 1754-1835), was educated as a lawyer in the Inns of Court, and was called to the English bar in 1780. He was a member of Parliament from Caithness for thirty years. He was named Baronet in 1782. On many occasions he was a follower of Pitt but on two occasions there was a wide rift between them. Sinclair was the first president of the Board of Agriculture. In 1811 he became commissioner of excise and was forced to relinquish his parliamentary seat. In 1813 he retired as President of the Board of Agriculture and returned to private life in Edinburgh. He died in 1835 and was entombed in Holyrood chapel. He was a voluminous author and correspondent on agriculture, history, literature, and statistical surveys of England and Scotland, and a staunch advocate of rural and financial reform. One of his contemporaries exclaimed Sinclair was "the most indefatigable man in Britain." See Dictionary of National Biography.

To Dr. David Stuart

4th June - 1800

Received from D:d Stuart1 two hundred and twenty five pounds which with the sums formerly received by me is payment in full of my annuity for the year 1800. 2

Martha Washington

DS. From the collection of Mr. Elmer Glasser, New London, Ohio. Photocopy furnished through the courtesy of ViMtV.

1.
Dr. David Stuart ( 1758-c. 1814) was the son of Reverend William Stuart, Rector of St Paul's Parish, Stafford County. He was a graduate of the College of William and Mary and received his medical degree from the University of Edinburgh. He Married Eleanor Calvert Custis, widow of John Parke Custis, in 1783. They lived first at Abingdon Plantation, north of Four Mile Run, on the Potomac. About 1792 they moved to his Hope Park Farm, and then later to Ossian Hall. All three residences were in Fairfax County. GW appointed him one of the first commissioners of the District of Columbia. Diaries, 4:92.
2.
In his will, GW stated that having sold his lands in Pennsylvania, a portion of a tract in New York State, the Dismal Swamp tract, lands in Gloucester County, the lands on the Great Kanawha River, and the Difficult Run tract, the money arising when the contracts were paid, was to be invested in "Bank Stock." The dividends from these shares were to be made available to MW during her life. After her death the principal was to "be subject to the general distribution hereafter directed." The annuity mentioned above probably refers to the interest derived from the bank shares. Prussing, The Estate of George Washington, Deceased, Boston, 1927, p. 56-57.

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Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington
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