Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview
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From a photostat in the Manuscript Division, Library of Congress.

1.
The letter illustrates Anderson's sensitive nature that Washington found annoying. On the whole, Anderson was a capable manager. Someone, possibly Lawrence Lewis, prevailed upon him to remain, for he later managed the White House tract in New Kent County. See supra, MW to James Anderson, June 21, 1800, n.1.

From David Hale

District of Maine Portland, July 24th 1800

Madam, (answd Oct 31 1800)

Having been summoned on a late occasion by the voice of my fellow citizens of this town & vicinity, to contribute my mite, however small, towards perpetuating the remembrance of that important era in the annals of our country, which is justly celebrated as the birthday of her Independence; I seize the opportunity, by presenting you a copy of what was exhibited on that occasion, to testify to you the veneration with which I have been accustomed to contemplate the virtues & talents of your deceased lord, who bore so distinguished a part in the establishment of that Independence - to assure you of the deep sense, which I entertain, of the extent of the calamity occasioned by his decease, both as it respects your individual, and as it respects the public, loss - and to offer you the sincerest condolence, which a heart, penetrated with ye magnitude of its country's woe, & overwhelmed with grief excited by the decease of amiable, an affectionate wife, is capable of bestowing.

I have the honour to be Madam, Your obedient servant David Hale1

Mrs. Martha Washington Mrs. Martha Washington Mount Vernon Virginia From David Hale July 24, 1800

ALS, ViMtV.

1.
An Oration... Portland... July 4, 1800...by David Hale... Portland... E.A.Jenks. 1800.

From Charles Lee

Madam Alexandria, 19th September 1800

I have the honor to enclose a draft of an instrument which I have prepared for your last Will agreeable to the ideas contained in the Instructions given to me under your hand which are now also returned to you that you may be better enabled to consider the same.

-392-

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