Worthy Partner: The Papers of Martha Washington

By Joseph E. Fields; Martha Washington | Go to book overview
The tract was called Walnut Tree Farm and was a section of the Clifton Neck portion of Mount Vernon. It later became known as "Wellington". It still stands. In his will GW confirmed the lease for the lifetime of Lear.
2.
George Fayette Washington, ( 1790-1865). He married Maria Frame. Charles Augustine Washington, (ca 1790 -?). He was unmarried. The date of his death is unknown. He is said to have died in Cadiz, Spain. Benjamin Lincoln Lear, ( 1791-1832). He was the only son of Tobias Lear and his first wife, Polly Long.
3.
Anna Maria Washington, ( 1788-1814). She was the oldest child of George Augustine Washington and Fanny Bassett Washington. She married Reuben Thornton.
4.
Mildred Washington Hammond, ( 1777-1804), was the daughter of General Washington's brother, Charles and therefore a sister of George Augustine Washington. She married Thomas Hammond and was the recipient of a 1/23 share of the estate of GW.
5.
Mary Stillson Lear, the mother of Tobias Lear, had apparently requested a lock of the General's hair.

From Robert Lewis

Dear Aunt, ( Ca. 1801?)

I am notified thro' my Brother Lawrence 1 of your inclination for a settlement of my Rental a/c. for the last year - Had I been prepared, I assure you, it wou'd have superceded the necessity of a summons, as it has ever been a rule with me never to retain money in my hands which was intended for or belonged to another person - I have at present near one hundred dollars of your money which has been the Collectors for State & Continental taxes - The balance (shou'd there be any) together with what I may collect from the Sheriff when the executions shall be return'd satisfied, will be remitted as early as possible-Tomorrow, I sett out by appointment to receive from the Sheriff, if the Sales of property has taken place, the whole or such part of the money as he may have recd. on a/c of the distresses - when I return, you shall hear more fully from me - I must now request, as I have often thought to do, that you will not pay any act. which may be presented to you by any publick officer on account of that part of the Estate which I have the management of- You have not been apprised, I judge, of the valuation of the property by the assistant assessors, if not, you will most assuredly be taken in - There is also claims against the Estate of Geo: Mercer which have been frequently & artfully blended in the Generals a/cs

Of this circumstance, I am the only person acquainted - you will, therefore, shou'd application be made, please to refer them to me.

I am sorry to hear of your indisposition, and hope ere this arrives, that you may have perfectly recover/d - A little excursion up the Country, probably as far as Doctr. Stuarts2 might be attended with beneficial consequences. - I remain, with great respect, your very affectionate nephew

Robt: Lewis - 3

-395-

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