Critical Essays on Alice Walker

By Ikenna Dieke | Go to book overview

Appendix: Chronology
1944Born to sharecropping parents Willie Lee and Minnie Tallula (Grant)
Walker-February 9 in a small rural town of Eatonton, Georgia.
1952Wounded in her right eye with a BB gun wielded by one of her brothers.
This incident would later have a profound effect on Walker, leading to
the kind of intense, inexorable self-consciousness discernible in all her
writing.
1961Matriculates at the prestigious Spelman College in Atlanta, GA.
1963-1965Transfers from Spelman to Sarah Lawrence College.
Takes a summer trip to Mother Africa.
Goes through the harrowing trauma of an abortion following an
unintended pregnancy.
Composes two landmark pieces: "To Hell with Dying," her first ever
published short story, and Once: Poems, her first volume of poetry.
1965-1966Graduates from Sarah Lawrence.
Participates in successful voter registration in Liberty County, GA.
Becomes an active worker for the Civil Rights Movement in racist
Mississippi.
1966Becomes the Breadloaf Writer's Conference Scholar.
1967Wins first prize in the American Scholar essay contest for her penetrating
essay, "The Civil Rights Movement: What Good Was It?"
Marries the Civil Rights attorney Melvyn Roseman Leventhal and
together, they have one child, daughter Rebecca, now a Yale graduate.
1968Publishes her first book of poems-- Once: Poems.
Takes up appointment as writer-in-residence and Black Studies professor
at Jackson State University (then Jackson State College), Jackson, MS.
1969Assumes a new teaching post at Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS.
1970Commences work on her important short story, "The Revenge of Hannah
Kemhuff."

Begins her crucial search for Zora Neale Hurston.
Publishes her first novel, The Third Life of Grange Copeland.
1971- 1972Becomes a Radcliffe Institute Fellow

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