Justice Joseph Story and the Rise of the Supreme Court

By Gerald T. Dunne | Go to book overview

Bibliopgraphy

The problem of selectivity, which haunts the effort to describe Story's crowded and varied life, returns with a vengeance in the framing of his bibliography. Throughout the text I have attempted to cite those authors upon whose works I have relied (although, with all good intentions, I am sure that I have failed to give all credit where credit was due). The listing below sets out works which I found in one way or another particularly helpful or which bear any especial relationship to a Story biography.

My selectivity has been highly eclectic. Here, as in the text, I have tried to keep the legal material to a minimum. For example, as a proxy of almost all the enormous amount of material on the Erie Railroad decision, I have listed Judge Henry Friendly's 1964 Cardozo lecture and a note from the Yale Law Journal, each of which contains a comprehensive array of citations in the matter. Again, on the questions of editions, I have sometimes listed the one which I used, sometimes the latest, and sometimes (e.g., in Story's works) the earliest. Finally, and after some hesitation, I have listed some of my own periodical articles which contain material not included in the text.

On qualitative appraisals I must acknowledge a debt to three authors whose insights have seemed to me extraordinarily luminous and penetrating. Considering the ephemerality of views and styles in history, Henry Adams' work on the Jefferson-Madison era seems actually to improve with age. While closer at hand in terms of origins, and still to undergo the test of time, Bray Hammond Banks and Politics in America appears to me to have high promise of being a timeless classic of American historiography, and I would pass a like appraisal on Richard Ward slim volume Andrew Jackson: Symbol for an Age.

-435-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Justice Joseph Story and the Rise of the Supreme Court
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 458

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.