Technology and Social Process

By Brian Elliott | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The arranging and financing of a collaborative seminar of this kind is a complex business and there are several organizations and individuals to be thanked. The generosity of the Canadian company, Northern Telecom Ltd deserves our greatest gratitude. Without their funding and the enthusiastic support of some of their executives neither the expenses of the satellite link nor the more general costs could have been met. But this meeting, like a good many others hosted by the Centre of Canadian Studies in Edinburgh, also enjoyed financial assistance from the Department of External Affairs in Canada, The British Council in Ottawa and the Foundation for Canadian Studies in the United Kingdom. To all of them thanks are due.

Organizing the satellite link - a complicated matter - was a task that fell largely to Tom Waugh of Edinburgh University's Department of Geography and to Ben McGleave of the University's Audio-Visual Services. Jonathan Wills, journalist and former Rector of the University, was the Edinburgh presenter for the teleconference session. Their efforts and those of many other people were greatly appreciated.

Throughout the months of planning two people provided invaluable assistance of the most diverse kind. Violet Laidlaw took on not only the secretarial but also many of the administrative duties and Ged Martin, Director of the Centre of Canadian Studies, was an unfailing source of enthusiasm and encouragement.

Finally, we should record much gratitude to Bruce Berman of the Politics Department at Queen's University. Along with his colleagues in the Studies in Communications and Information Technology group there he set up the Kingston seminar, arranged the Canadian end of the satellite link and still found time to come to Edinburgh to deliver a paper.

BRIAN ELLIOTT

-xi-

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