The Origins and Development of Federal Crime Control Policy: Herbert Hoover's Initiatives

By James D. Calder | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Historical authorship demands single-minded dedication to archival evidence and sensible interpretations of the past. Archival repositories and dusty collections of papers and books become, indeed, jealous lovers. The pursuit of morsels of information and the arrangement of the puzzle are not enterprises that many would not accept as useful work. But this is the historian's craft. To all those who have stood by and who have attempted to understand, both in deeds and words, I express my admiration, gratitude and respect.

My academic mentors deserve the highest admiration for their examples of intellectual achievement and collegial encouragement. The seeds of this work germinated in the patience expressed and time taken by Professors George S. Blair (deceased), Gerald I. Jordan, John P. Kenney, and Peter P. Lejins. George H. Nash, official biographer of Herbert Hoover and friend in historical inquiry, inspired completion of this project by examples of dedication and belief in his subject.

In the main, this book was a labor of love and personal funding. A seed grant was given by the board of directors of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library Association and its former executive director, R. Lawrence Angove. Additional travel support to visit collections was provided by the University of Texas at San Antonio. To each of these organizations and the persons who signed the checks, I express my sincere appreciation.

The stalwarts of research and publication are the archivists, librarians, computer wizards, and production editors. Space does not permit a complete list of the professionals who assisted in this research

-xiii-

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