Yearbook of International Environmental Law - Vol. 7

By Günther Handl; Jutta Brunnée et al. | Go to book overview

Environmental Law and Policy; and volumes 4 and 5 of UNEP's Biannual Bulletin of Environmental Law.

UNEP continued its work in the area of electronic information access. During February, a joint technical working group meeting of UNEP and IUCN representatives concluded that the integration of the two organizations' respective environmental law information systems was both feasible and desirable. Subsequent discussions resulted in agreement in December on a written project proposal for donor funding.

Environmental Law and Institutions Programme Activity Centre, UNEP


15. UNITED NATIONS FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION (FAO)

(1) World Food Summit

Between 13 and 17 November 1996, nearly 10,000 delegates and journalists converged on FAO headquarters in Rome for the World Food Summit. The aim of the Summit--an unprecedented gathering in the history of the UN and the world--was to raise awareness about issues surrounding world hunger, namely, the fact that more than 800 million human beings are not able to meet their most basic nutritional needs. The Summit's overriding goal was to garner high-level political support for making concrete progress in achieving global food security, and two documents were adopted at the opening session: the (→) (Rome Declaration on World Food Security and the (→) Rome Plan of Action, which details the Declaration's policy statements. Both documents were carefully crafted and agreed upon by consensus during meetings of the FAO Committee on World Food Security over a two-year period, with the input of all the member countries of FAO. Reaffirming the right of every person to be free from hunger, the heads of states and governments pledged their political will and shared commitment to ensuring that "all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life," with an "immediate view to reducing the number of undernourished people to half their present level no later than 2015."

The commitments contained in the Plan of Action are intended to lay the foundations for diverse paths to a common objective--food security and a significant decrease in chronic hunger--at the individual, household, national, regional, and global levels. These commitments cover seven interrelated areas for governments to address: (i) general conditions for economic and social progress conducive to food security; (ii) policies aimed at poverty eradication and access to adequate food; (iii) sustainable increases in food production; (iv) consideration of the contribution of trade to food security; (v) prevention of, preparedness for, and response to food emergencies; (vi)

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