Practical Approaches to Using Learning Styles in Higher Education

By Rita Dunn; Shirley A. Griggs | Go to book overview

Chapter 20
Contract Activity Packages in Higher
Education: The Flexible Flyer of Pedagogy
Heather Pfleger Dunham and Barbara-Jayne Lewthwaite

It is the first day of a new semester, and Professor Roundemup has just overviewed the entire semester's schedule with his students, assigned them to working groups, and noted the dates for their presentations. As those undergraduates filed out at the end of the class, he mentally congratulated himself on his organizational skills. However, as he turned to pick up his brief case, his desk was surrounded by three concerned young people.

The first was a professionally dressed young man who told the professor that he had just received a promotion that required travel. Unfortunately, he would have to miss several classes and wondered whether the professor could make some schedule adjustments for him.
The second was a charming, obviously expectant young mother who explained that her physician had prohibited her from driving and that she would have to forgo the pleasure of working with classmates on assignments. Would the professor permit her to complete the assignments and the presentation independently?
The third had family that had fled from the Serbians in Yugoslavia. She had to fly there to try to locate parents and two siblings, but promised to have all assignments done and submitted as soon as she and her husband returned. Would he allow her to do that?

Today's college and university populations are different and more diverse than previously. The student body represents a broad spectrum in terms of age, experience, culture, ethnicity, levels of preparedness, and scheduling challenges. As a result, it has become a real chore for instructors and support staff to meet the needs of all students.

We have found that Contract Activity Packages (CAPs) are an innovative

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