Practical Approaches to Using Learning Styles in Higher Education

By Rita Dunn; Shirley A. Griggs | Go to book overview

Appendix F
Law School Quiz
Prof. Robin A. Boyle
St. John's University School of Law
LAW QUIZ
Point Headings, Persuasive Writing, Adverse Cases, and Citations
Work independently, with a partner, or in small groups, using your assigned texts to answer the following questions:
A. Point Headings
1. What is a point heading?
2. Where should point headings be located in the brief?
3. What is the purpose of point headings?
4. Do you move from general to specific headings or vice versa?
5. Suppose you had a major heading, two subheadings, and three lesser subheadings. Which one would you put in:
a. All capital letters, no underlining;
b. No capital letters, with underlining;
c. No capital letters, no underlining.
6. What should your point headings contain?
a. If you have only major headings, and no subheadings, what goes into the major heading?
b. If you have major and minor headings, what goes into each?
B. Skim manual chapter, Ten Tips for Writing a Persuasive Brief. Then, close the manual. How many brief writing tips can you provide below and on the back of this page?
C. Adverse Cases
1. When do you need to cite an adverse case?
2. Where do you place adverse cases in the argument section of your brief?

-235-

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