Ocean's End: Travels through Endangered Seas

By Colin Woodard | Go to book overview

five
Fall of the Magic Kingdom

CAYE CAULKER IS AS RELAXED a tourist destination as you can find. It's a low sandy island, 5 miles long and one-quarter-mile wide, except at the sparsely populated southern end, where thick mangroves triple its girth. The village clusters around two parallel tracks of soft coral sand--the "front" and "back" streets--named for their proximity to the trade winds. There are no cars, just a couple of rusting pick-up trucks to move cargo and a small fleet of electric golf carts. Most people simply walk. Nothing is very far away on Caulker, and nobody is in any hurry to get where they're going.

The handful of restaurants, guest houses, and family-owned hotels cluster on the front-side shore, facing the open sea alongside the homes of the more influential islanders and a handful of U.S. and North European-born Caulkerites. Most of the latter came for a visit a decade or more ago and never left. All front-side property is cooled by the steady winds, which blow hungry mosquitoes and sand flies to the back side of the island, where they bite less fortunate Caulkerites sitting in still, fetid heat a mere hundred yards away. The back shore is still and sweltering day and night, its homes facing towards the thick jungles of mainland Belize, the urban jungles of Belize City, 20 miles across the waves.

Like most visitors, I had come to see Belize's world-renowned coral reefs. Belize itself is something of a backwater: Few Americans have heard of this little nation of 180,000 people; even fewer could

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ocean's End: Travels through Endangered Seas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface XI
  • One: Dead Seas 1
  • Two: Ocean Blues 29
  • Three: Run on the Banks 57
  • Four: Muddied Waters 97
  • Five: Fall of the Magic Kingdom 131
  • Six: Paradise Lost 163
  • Seven: Message from the Ice 191
  • Eight: Sea Change 225
  • Appendix Large Marine Ecosystems 251
  • Acknowledgments 255
  • Note 257
  • Index 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 304

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.