American Women Writers to 1800

By Sharon M. Harris | Go to book overview

Captivity Narratives and
Travel Journals

Mary White Rowlandson (1637?-1711)

Mary White was born in Somerset, England, around 1637; she emigrated to Salem, Massachusetts, with her parents, Joan and John White, and her nine siblings. Little is known of her life until 1656 when she married Reverend Joseph Rowlandson of Lancaster, Massachusetts. They had three surviving children. White Rowlandson's life was radically altered during King Philip's War ( 1675-1678). On February 10, 1676, Narragansett warriors attacked the settlement of Lancaster. White Rowlandson and her three children (Joseph, 14 years; Mary, 10 years; and Sarah, 6 years) were taken captive. Sarah died shortly after their capture, and White Rowlandson was separated from Joseph and Mary. After she was ransomed by her husband on May 2, the family resided in Boston for five years and then moved to Wethersfield, Connecticut where her husband soon died, and she married Captain Samuel Talcott in August 1679.

Three years later, Mary White Rowlandson published a narrative of her captivity experiences. Although the Narrative became one of the first best-sellers in America, it was the only literature White Rowlandson ever wrote. She graphically detailed her experiences and recounted her spiritual struggles during her ordeal as well as the poignant realities of her psychological state after her return. If the Narrative dramatically relates one woman's courage under horrendous conditions, its depiction of the Algonkian people as savages and monsters is typical of Puritan representations of a race that they never acknowledged as equals. Mary White Rowlandson died in Wethersfield on January 5, 1711.

Works: The Soveraignty and the Goodness of GOD, Together With the Faithfulness of His Promises Displayed; Being a Narrative of the Captivity and Restauration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson ( 1682). Bibliography: Breitwieser; Derounian, "The Publication . . . of Mary Rowlandson's Indian Captivity Narrative"; Greene; Lang, "Introduction".

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Women Writers to 1800
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Note on the Text xii
  • Introduction 3
  • I- The Ages of Women 31
  • Youthful Reflections 41
  • On Women''s Education 63
  • Domestic Records 79
  • Businesswomen''s Writings 105
  • "Death-Bed" Declarations Skate''Ne (choctaw) 123
  • II- Emerging Feminist Voices 133
  • Feminist Visions 137
  • III- Origins, Revolutions, and Women in the Nations 161
  • First Women 173
  • Spiritual Narratives 197
  • Captivity Narratives and Travel Journals 217
  • Epistolary Exchanges 235
  • Petitions, Political Essays, and Organizational Tracts 251
  • Revolutionary War Writings 269
  • Poetry 303
  • Histories 349
  • Drama 373
  • Novels 393
  • Notably Early American Women 413
  • Selected Bibliography 421
  • Index 432
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.