Women and Western American Literature

By Helen Winter Stauffer; Susan J. Rosowski | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Harold P. Howard, Sacajawea ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971). Grace Raymond Hebard, Sacajawea: A Guide and Interpreter of the Lewis and Clark Expedition ( Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1933), has been discredited in recent years because there is no known surviving hard evidence-either objects or documents-to prove that the Wyoming woman was the real Sacajawea and also because Hebard seems to have been interested in promoting the guide myth and women's rights through her writing about the Shoshone woman. Also arguing that the Wyoming woman was the real Sacajawea is the recent book by Ella E. Clark and Margot Edmonds, Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979). Clark and Edmonds review the oral sources used by Hebard, including the work of Dr. Charles Eastman and others. They conclude that the Indian woman did not guide the Expedition. However, they do agree with Hebard that the historical Sacajawea is the one buried in Wyoming. Clark and Edmonds present little or no new evidence, they all but ignore Harold P. Howard's biographical labors, and they briefly pass over the evidence he used to arrive at his position that Sacajawea died on the upper Missouri in 1812.
2
Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, Original Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1804-1806, 8 vols., ed., Reuben Gold Thwaites ( New York: Dodd, Mead, 1904-1905).
3
Bernard De Voto, The Course of Empire ( Boston: Houghton-Mifflin, 1952), p. 618.
4
Ronald W. Taber, "Sacajawea and the Suffragettes: An Interpretation of a Myth", Pacific Northwest Quarterly, 58 ( 1967), 8.
5
Taber, "Sacajawea", p. 7.
6
Thomas Bulfinch, Oregon and Eldorado; or, Romance of the Rivers ( Boston: J. E. Tilton, 1866), x.

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and Western American Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 331

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.