Regulation and Protectionism under GATT: Case Studies in North American Agriculture

By Andrew Schmitz; Garth Coffin et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

production controls is the reduction of government costs and the level of antagonism among traders in the world market for dairy products even though smaller farm preservation is undoubtedly also a factor. In the United States, the pressure for controls results from a combination of the desire to lower government costs, raise milk prices and preserve a moderately sized, dairy farm structure. The lack of consensus is the result of diversity and regionalism that is developing within the US dairy industry. Both Republican and Democratic administrations are opposed to production controls because they run counter to freer trade objectives and reduce competitiveness.

This discussion also raises important issues regarding the role of producer-oriented institutions in an economic environment of freer trade. The answer is quite simple. Under conditions of free trade, producer-oriented institutions, such as cooperatives or marketing boards, should do whatever is required to keep farmers competitive in the marketplace. This involves promoting progressiveness in both production and marketing. It begins with support of progressive, basic and applied research at universities. It includes facilitating the transfer of technology to farmers as a means of leveling the playing field. It involves providing milk processors with services (such as forage quality testing, soil testing and cow milker training), product development, minimum quality standards and aggressiveness in exporting as well as in domestic marketing. It is only through such progressive institutions that an industry expects to remain competitive. This is the case regardless of which long-run policy scenario is pursued.


References

Cropp, R. 1995. "The California Milk Price Stabilization Program". Dairy Markets and Policy: Issues and Options O-10. Cornell University, Department of Agricultural Economics, Ithaca, NY.

Fallert, R. F., D. P. Blayney, and J. J. Miller. 1990. Dairy: Background for 1990 Farm Legislation. Commodity Economics Division, ERS/USDA (March).

GAO/RCED. 1993. Dairy Industry Potential for and Barriers to Market Development 94-19. Washington, DC (December).

Gruebele, J. W. 1978. "Effects of Removing the Dairy Price-Support Program". Illinois Agricultural Economics 18: 30-38.

Kaiser, H. M. 1986. Mandatory Supply Management Programs in Canada and Europe. Cornell Agricultural Economics Staff Paper No. 86-21, Cornell University, Department of Agricultural Economics, Ithaca, NY.

Knutson, R. D., J. B. Penn, and W. T. Boehm. 1995. Agricultural and Food Policy. 3rd ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Manchester, A. 1983. The Public Role in the Dairy Economy: Why and How Governments Intervene in the Milk Business. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Regulation and Protectionism under GATT: Case Studies in North American Agriculture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?