Valerius Flaccus' Argonautica: Abbreviated Voyages in Silver Latin Epic

By Debra Hershkowitz | Go to book overview

4
Digressions: The Road Not Taken

TWO ROADS DIVERGED

When Apollonius' Argonauts reach the Hellespont, they sail through it without any pomp or circumstance:

('And during that night, in the eddies from the moving ship, they finished passing between the dark-gleaming Hellespont', AR 1. 934-5). For Valerius' Argonauts, however, the occasion is a little more notable:

ecce autem prima uolucrem sub luce dehiscens terruit unda ratem uittataque constitit Helle, iam Panopes Thetidisque soror iainque aurea laeua sceptra tenens, duin sternit aquas proccrcsque ducenique aspicit et placidis conipellat lasona dictis . . .

But look, at first light the waves, gaping open beneath it, terrified the flying ship, and fillet-wearing Helle stood up, now the sister of Panope and Thetis and now holding a golden sccptre in her left hand, while she made the waves subside and saw the princes and their leader, and addressed Jason with calm words . . . (2. 587-91).

After encouraging Jason in his task, Helle instructs him to perform certain rites when he reaches Phrixus' tomb at Phasis, and then, before vanishing again beneath the waves, she gives him a message to pass on to her brother's ashes:

non ego per Stygiae, quod rcre, silentia ripae, frater, agor. frustra uacul scrutaris Auerni, care, uias neque enim scopulis me et fluctibus actam frangit hiems. celeri extemplo subiere ruentem Cyrnothoe Glaucusque nianu. pater ipse profundi has etiam sedes, hacc numine tradidit acquo regna nec Inois noster sinus inuidet undis.

I am not driven through the silence of the banks of the Styx, as you think, brother. In vain, dear one, you search the paths of empty Avernus, nor

-190-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Valerius Flaccus' Argonautica: Abbreviated Voyages in Silver Latin Epic
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 301

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.