Sacred Song from the Byzantine Pulpit: Romanos the Melodist

By R. J. Schork | Go to book overview

ishment." Both denotations are appropriately applied as the tale of the rise and fall of the first humans unfolds.


NOTES
1.
The Greek text on which I base my translation is that of Maas, Frühbyzantinische Kirchenpoesie, 13-16.
2.
There are only twenty-four letters in the Greek alphabet. Thus, my attempt to provide an approximate equivalent in translation does not use the English alphabet "Y" or "Z," and I have hedged a bit by adopting "Ex" for the rare initial "X." The sole purpose of this experiment is to suggest, imperfectly, the author's skill in constructing his original acrostic and to highlight Romanos' far greater ingenuity for his more complex acrostics.
3.
See Romanos et les origines, 28-31, for some brief comments on this work and another early kontakion much like it.

The First Humans

I. After you formed the first human with your hands, Lord, you valued him above all creation. You made him an image of your unique being. And so, amazed at your love for our kind, we say: "What a premium was placed upon the human race!" 3:Rm.1:20L4:Tt.3:4L 5 and refrain passim: Heb. 3:3L

I. Although the Creator of the universe lives beyond time, after he marked an end to the span of creation he wanted to make one creature first in rank, and decided to give earth a master. What a premium was placed upon the human race!

2. But as he weighed these plans, God confounded the corps of angels: which of them would wield this power and be chosen king of the newly created world? What a premium was placed upon the human race! 2: Lk.2:13L4 :Heb.2:5L

-44-

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Sacred Song from the Byzantine Pulpit: Romanos the Melodist
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Citations and Abbreviation xv
  • Concordance of Kontakion Numbers xvii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • Notes 36
  • Part 2 - The Sung Sermons 41
  • "The First Humans" 43
  • Notes 44
  • "The Nativity I" (1) 49
  • Notes 50
  • "The Presentation in the Temple" (4) 60
  • Note 61
  • Healing the Leper" (8) 69
  • Notes 70
  • "The Sinful Woman" (10) 77
  • "The Man Possessed by Demons" (11) 86
  • Notes 87
  • "Judas" (17) 96
  • Notes 97
  • "Mary at the Cross" (19) 106
  • Note 107
  • "The Passion of Christ" (20) 115
  • Note 116
  • "The Victory of the Cross (22)" 125
  • Notes 126
  • "The Resurrection Vi" (29) 135
  • "Abraham and Isaac" (41) 148
  • Notes 149
  • "The Temptation of Joseph" (44) 158
  • Notes 162
  • "Repentance: Jonah and Nineveh" (52) 176
  • Note 177
  • "Earthquakes and Fires" (54) 184
  • Notes 185
  • "The Forty Martyrs of Sebasteia I" (57) 196
  • Notes 198
  • "The Akathistos Hymn" 207
  • Notes 208
  • Bibliography 221
  • Index 227
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