Rhetoric and Pedagogy: Its History, Philosophy, and Practice: Essays in Honor of James J. Murphy

By Winifred Bryan Horner; Michael Leff | Go to book overview

Preface

This book is a celebration of James J. Murphy's long career as teacher and scholar, a career that gives no indication of abating as attested by the "works in progress" at the end of his bibliography.

Many of the contributors to this book actually had the privilege of sitting in his classroom at the universities where he taught. The quality of their work and their status in the profession are evidence of his influence and his skill. At his own university, The University of California, Davis, he served briefly as vice chancellor for Student Affairs and associate dean of the College of Letters and Science. He also served two terms as chair of his own department, one of the few rhetoric departments in the United States. But his teaching extends far beyond his own university. Through his many publications, which have appeared in journals as diverse as the British Library Occasional Papers, Studi Medievali, Rhetorica, Poetica, the American Benedictine Review, Arts Liberaux et Philosophie au Moyen Age, as well as in all of the major communications journals in the United States, he has reached out to students and scholars all over the world. Every student of rhetoric knows and has learned from his work. He functions as a master teacher instructing and inspiring scholars far beyond the walls of his own classroom. Finally, he has never seen his work as excluding pedagogy, or theory as separate from practice, or research as outside the realm of teaching.

In addition to his wide influence as a teacher, or perhaps as part of it, Professor Murphy has for years obtained funds to bring together scholars interested in the history of rhetoric at a number of conferences he organized. He has functioned as a great facilitator in gathering together scholars from the United States, Europe, and Asia who shared a common interest in the history of rhetoric--to exchange ideas, to disseminate their work, and just to talk across cultures, gender, and

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