Moscow DMZ: The Story of the International Effort to Convert Russian Weapons Science to Peaceful Purposes

By Glenn E. Schweitzer | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

Fear of a Weapons Brain Drain
Stirs International Action

Nuclear Scientists of All Friendly Countries, Unite. . . . The International Science and Technology Center Will Soon Be Established in Moscow.

Major M. Pogorelyi, Red Star, March 4, 1992


Struggling Scientists in the Weapons Complex

In the wake of the failed Moscow coup of August 1991, an increasing number of reports reached the West about Middle Eastern countries approaching Russian institutions in search of nuclear, chemical, biological, rocket, and related technologies. According to this information, the countries wanted technologies that could enhance their military capabilities to deliver lethal blows to nearby adversaries. Western concern centered primarily on transfers of technologies already embodied in the hardware for weapons systems; but the importance of foreign technical experts to help adapt, assemble, and maintain the equipment was very clear.

In December 1991, Time magazine published an article entitled "Who Else Will Have the Bomb?" that presented a graphic depiction of the routes of diffusion of nuclear weaponry throughout the world. The report warned that Russia "could sell nuclear equipment or provide technical aid by out-of-work scientists" to countries such as Iran, North Korea, Iraq, Algeria, Libya, and Syria. More ominously, Time underscored that China, which was soon to become one of Russia's closest collaborators and an international conduit in the nuclear field, was "recklessly peddling nuclear equipment and expertise to any nation willing to pay cash." 1

Also by the end of 1991, many formerly secret research and development (R&D) institutions in Russia had begun to open their doors to

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Moscow DMZ: The Story of the International Effort to Convert Russian Weapons Science to Peaceful Purposes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 291

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.