Rhetoric and Pedagogy: Its History, Philosophy, and Practice: Essays in Honor of James J. Murphy

By Winifred Bryan Horner; Michael Leff | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
Antonio Riccobono: The Teaching of Rhetoric in 16th-Century Padua

William A. Wallace
Catholic University of America

One of the little studied texts for the teaching of rhetoric in the late Renaissance is the Latin translation of Aristotle Rhetoric published by Antonio Riccobono in 1579, with an accompanying commentary, also in Latin.1 In this chapter, whose aim is to honor Professor James J. Murphy--himself an indefatigable teacher of rhetoric and translator of Latin rhetoric texts--I analyze Riccobono's views on the nature of rhetoric. These Riccobono presents in the first treatise of his commentary, a treatise he entitles De natura rhetoricae, where he is concerned not only with explicating Aristotle's views on the subject but also with treating rhetoric's relation to other disciplines in the curriculum of his day. Although

____________________
1
The full title reads Aristotelis ars rhetorica ab Antonio Riccobono Rhodigino i. c. humanitatem in Patavino gymnasio profitente latine conversa. Eiusque Riccoboni explicationum liber, quo Aristotelis loca obscuriora declarantur, et Rhetorica praxis explicatur in orationibus Ciceronis pro Marcello, et pro Milone, ac oratione Demosthenis ad epistolam Philippi ab eodem latina facta ( Venice: Apud Paulum Beiettum, Bibliopolam Patavinum, 1579). Also included in this edition is Riccobono's translation of Aristotle Poetics, entitled Aristotelis ars poetica ab eodem in latinam linquam versa. Cum eiusdem de re comica disputatione. The last-named item, the treatise on comedy, has been reprinted, with notes, in Bernard Weinberg, ed., Trattati di poetica e retorica del cinquecento, 4 vols., Scrittori d'Italia n. 253 ( Bari: Laterza, 1972) 3:255-276, 504-507.

With regard to Riccobono Rhetorica, Paul D. Brandes notes that an earlier, partial edition containing only the translation of the first book was also issued ( Padua: Laurentius Pasquatus, 1577). Subsequent printings of the complete edition appeared at Frankfurt in 1588, at Lyons in 1590, again at Frankfurt in 1593, at Vicenza in 1594, at Lyons in 1597, and at Avignon in 1599. See Paul D. Brandes , A History of Aristotle's Rhetoric, with a Bibliography of Early Printings ( Metuchen, NJ: The Scarecrow Press, 1989) 88-89, 149-151.

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rhetoric and Pedagogy: Its History, Philosophy, and Practice: Essays in Honor of James J. Murphy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 337

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.