Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Environmental Protection and Economic Well-Being: The Economic Pursuit of Quality

By Thomas Michael Power | Go to book overview

Chapter Three

The Dominance of Quality in Economic
Pursuits, Continued: Clothing, Housing,
and Stone Age Economics.

1. Protection from the Elements: Clothing Expenditures and the Pursuit of Necessity

a. Introduction

The survival function of clothes is to protect the body from the elements, and the only truly necessary tailoring is that required to allow a person to engage in other survival activities while wearing the clothing. Choice of materials would be based on a trade-off between durability and the resource cost of making the clothes. In many places and seasons, little or no clothing is needed for protection.

Functional considerations are far removed from our production and purchase of clothing. Cultural convention, style, appearance, cut, color, and texture dominate, not protection from the elements and durability. There are few areas of "basic" production and expenditure in which the pursuit of shifting styles plays such an explicit role. These aesthetic standards not only render clothes obsolete before they are worn out but also add considerably to their initial cost. In addition, convention requires that we have multiple sets of clothes, each appropriate to particular places and occasions.


b. Necessary Clothing Expenditures

One way of estimating what truly functional clothing would cost would be to look at what it costs the United States military to clothe a soldier in the field. Field clothing, as opposed to the dress uniform, is intended to be functional, cheap, and durable.

Data are available on both the "standard-issue" clothing provided to new soldiers and the cost of maintaining and replacing this clothing over a long period. In 1995, the standard-issue clothing listed in Table 3.1 cost between $200 and $265 per year, depending upon the climate in which the person was assumed to be living ( U.S. Department of Defense, 1995).

-40-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Environmental Protection and Economic Well-Being: The Economic Pursuit of Quality
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 251

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.