Spanish Texas, 1519-1821

By Donald E. Chipman | Go to book overview

ONE
Texas: The Land and the People

TO WALK THE BOUNDARIES OF MODERN TEXAS WOULD require a trek of more than 3,800 miles. Circumscribed would be a remarkably diverse land encompassing 267,338 square miles of rivers, beaches, plains, woodlands, basins, deserts, and mountains. The physical dimensions of contemporary Texas have led scholars such as D. W. Meinig to use the word "imperial" in describing the size and importance of the Lone Star State. Even when writing about only the eastern twofifths of Texas, where black slavery thrived in the antebellum period, Randolph B. Campbell called that region An Empire for Slavery, for it equaled in size the combined states of Alabama and Mississippi. 1

To be sure, Hispanic Texas as a physical unit comprised far less than the totality of the present state of Texas, but the province--known to the Spanish as Tejas or the New Kingdom of the Philippines--was nevertheless imperial in size. It lay north of the Medina River and east of its headwaters, extending into present Louisiana. However, throughout the three centuries that Spain laid claim to Texas, her soldiers, missionaries, settlers, and pathfinders traversed every major physiographic region of the modern state. In carrying out land and sea explorations, military campaigns, and missionary enterprises, Spaniards came into contact with the "first Texans," Native Americans who had hunted and farmed the land; fished the creeks, rivers, and shorelines; and gathered the fruits of nature for hundreds of years. The Indian cultures of Texas, many of which no longer existed by the time Europeans permanently settled the province, were perhaps as varied in their patterns as the landscape itself. This chapter describes the physical, environmental, and human dimensions of Texas when its modern history began in the first decades of the sixteenth century. Texas Indians are addressed as they entered the recorded annals of the state's history through contacts with European explorers and conquistadors.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Spanish Texas, 1519-1821
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 343

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.