Spanish Texas, 1519-1821

By Donald E. Chipman | Go to book overview

ELEVEN
The Twilight of Spanish Texas, 1803-1821

FROM THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE IN 1803 TO JULY 21, 1821, when the flag of Castile and León was lowered for the last time at San Antonio, Texas experienced its most turbulent and bloody years as a Spanish province. Along the Sabine River, a shared but undefined border with the United States highlighted continuing problems over the extent of and rights to Spanish and American possessions on the North American continent. Throughout much of the eighteenth century, Texas had been the outer bulwark for New Spain, but in 1803 the province faced a new circumstance. For the first time its Spanish subjects stood face to face with Anglo-Americans who embodied what Julia K. Garrett called "the greatest evil to monarchy, the rising plague of the nineteenth century--ideas of liberty--theories of popular sovereignty--and revolution." A non-Indian population in Texas of less than four thousand, largely vacant and dilapidated missions, two fixed presidios, three settlements, and two roads were the only "memorials of Spain's imperial enterprises in this primeval kingdom." To Spain's credit, it gave increased attention to Texas over the better part of two decades. The indefinite boundary that separated Texas from land-hungry Anglo-Americans moved Spain to adopt a threefold approach: "First, to hold the territory with its ancient boundaries unimpaired; second, to increase its garrisons and colonize the territory with loyal Spanish subjects; and third, to keep out Anglo-American intruders." To a remarkable degree, Spain accomplished those goals, but the real danger to continuing control of Texas lay festering within Spain and its American empire. 1 The ambitions of Napoleon Bonaparte, revolution in the heartland of New Spain, and the reactionary policies of King Ferdinand VII in Spain itself spelled the loss of an entire viceroyalty. This chapter first examines critically important events transpiring beyond the confines of Texas. Then against the backdrop of revolutionary developments in Europe and New Spain, it ex

-216-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Spanish Texas, 1519-1821
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 343

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.