Human Rights, Labor Rights, and International Trade

By Lance A. Compa; Stephen F. Diamond | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
Labor Rights in the Global Economy A Case Study of the

Stephen F. Diamond

Congressional approval of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) at the end of 1993 inflicted upon the American trade union movement its most visible and demoralizing defeat in recent years. Hoping against hope that a Democratic president would signal a turnaround in the fate of organized labor, trade unionists were stunned to find themselves on opposite sides of the barricades from an administration that had won the election on a nominally pro-worker ("It's the economy, stupid!") platform. But the President did pledge that NAFTA would only be put through after "side agreements" on labor and the environment were hammered out in new negotiations with Mexico and Canada. The labor side agreement, formally known as the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC), was a second-best compromise worked out in the last few weeks of negotiations.

Given the open hostility expressed by American labor leaders upon NAFTA's passage, it seems unlikely that the relatively weak provisions of the NAALC will be taken at all seriously by the labor movement. I think that this would be a serious mistake on the part of organized labor. It is the purpose of this essay to explore the emerging field of regulating trade between nations through social provisions such as the NAALC. I want to suggest that such provisions, no matter how weak, are essential to effective organization of an increasingly transnational economy. Further, the full and active participation of interested parties is critical to realizing the sociopolitical potential in such regulatory provisions. This is especially true in the case of institutions like trade unions, which have long been considered central to our very concept of democratic pluralism.

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Rights, Labor Rights, and International Trade
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 311

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.