The R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

By Nannie M. Tilley | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Even before its absorbtion into R. J. Reynolds Industries, the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, now nearing its 109th year, ranked in sales among the first sixty industrial corporations of the United States. Moreover, in the accumulation of net profits it was eighteenth in 1961, seventeenth in 1962, and eighteenth in 1963. Among the first sixty corporations listed by Fortune magazine, the company is one of only three with headquarters in the South. In addition, it is the largest corporation in this group with both administrative and executive headquarters in the southern United States.

In 1875 Richard Joshua Reynolds invested $7,500 in a new enterprise for the manufacture of flat-plug chewing tobacco. By 1963 the company that evolved from this small beginning produced all of the major types of tobacco products except cigars and snuff, listed its assets at $1,037,639,534, employed 14,932 men and women, sold products totaling $1,672,444,707, and paid $68,000,000 in dividends to 103,282 stockholders. In achieving this position the company was continually under the management of southerners--many of them natives of North Carolina.

Among the various employees and officers of the company who helped make this history possible, I am greatly indebted to the late John C. Whitaker. He became an employee of the company in 1913 and ended his career as chairman of the board in 1959. In 1950, he began to plan for a history of the company, and appointed Erwin W. Cook, Dell Mc- Keithan, and W. S. Koenig to interview many of the oldest employees from Will Reynolds to the lowliest workman in Factory Number 8. Although Whitaker was unable to turn his full attention to the history until 1958, the material gathered by Cook, McKeithan, and Koenig proved to be invaluable.

My first information about such a history came in the fall of 1958 in a letter from William J. Conrad, Jr., then vice-president and secretary of the company, asking my advice on procedure. Understanding what lay behind this request, I began to consider the matter in the light of my long-time interest in the tobacco industry and my appreciation of the company's historic stand in support of the efforts of tobacco farmers to sell their leaf cooperatively. I flew to Winston-Salem and, with Charles B. Wade, Jr., made arrangements that, as the text of this volume will indicate, imposed no restrictions on me. At that time, however, I learned virtually nothing

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 708

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.