Franco: Silent Ally in World War II

By Willard L. Beaulac | Go to book overview

4 SERRANO

Ramón Serrano Suñer made an extremely important contribution to defeating Germany's purposes in Spain, but in doing so he acquired a reputation as a Nazi appeaser.

Serrano achieved high position in the Nationalist government in part because he was Franco's brother-in-law. More accurately, he and Franco were married to sisters. The Spanish name for brother-in-law is cuñado. Franco had the military rank of Generalísimo. Serrano became popularly known as the Cuñadísimo. The name indicated the power Spaniards thought he had and where it came from.

A prominent lawyer from Saragossa, Jesuit-educated and with a flair for politics, Serrano was in many ways the opposite of the stolid Franco. Slender, blue-eyed, prematurely gray and emotional, prior to the Civil War he had been a member of Gil Robles' CEDA, and head of Juventud de Acción Popular ( JAP), its youth movement, whose members wore green shirts and used a modified fascist salute. The pre-Civil War Falangists ridiculed JAP as too tepid to be useful. The Falange's

-74-

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Franco: Silent Ally in World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Spanish Foreign Policy 1
  • 2 - Franco 33
  • 3 - Beigbeder 61
  • 4 - Serrano 74
  • 5 - Weddell 95
  • 6 - Jordana 121
  • 7 - Hoare 135
  • 8 - Hayes 160
  • 9 - Instruments and Obstacles 195
  • 10 Epilogue 207
  • Selected Bibliography Index 215
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 221
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