Academia in Upheaval: Origins, Transfers, and Transformations of the Communist Academic Regime in Russia and East Central Europe

By Michael David-Fox; György Péteri | Go to book overview

national peers. As long as the new democratic, liberal institutions and political practices prevail, and as long as newly won international openness applies, the persistence of the old academic establishments can do little to undermine all these tendencies. Indeed, in the face of broader systemic change, the old establishments have been equally powerless to resist the radical academic restructuring that has so successfully turned the systemic overstrech of research and development into "history."


NOTES
1.
Eric Hobsbawm, "The New Threat to History" (lecture at the Central European University, Budapest), New York Review of Books, 16 December, 1993, 62.
2.
On the fate of the AdW, see Renate Maynz, "Academy of Sciences in Crisis: A Case Study of a Fruitless Struggle for Survival," in Coping with Trouble: How Science Reacts to Political Disturbances of Research Conditions, ed. Uwe Schimank and Andreas Stucke ( Frankfurt and New York: Camous Verlag and St. Martin's Press, 1994), 163-188.
3.
On the changing status, prestige, roles, and identities of the Polish intelligentsia, which is to a great extent applicable to the whole region, see Joanna Kurczewska, "The Polish Intelligentsia: Retiring from the Stage," Polish Sociological Bulletin, no. 2 ( 1992): 149-158.
4.
J. Szczepanski, "Society, Science and Government in Poland," in Society, Science, Government, ed. A. Kuklinksi, Science and Government Series, vol. 2 ( Warsaw: State Committee for Scientific Research, Republic of Poland, 1992), 296.
5.
See also Ferenc Jánossy, interview by András B. Hegedás and Gyula Kozák , in Medvetánc ( Budapest), 1986/4-1987/1, 284-285.
6.
György Péteri, Effects of World War I: War Communism in Hungary, 1919 ( New York: Brooklyn College Press, 1984), 113.
7.
My translation from the Hungarian edition of Voprosy leninizma (Problems of Leninism). J. V. Sztálin, A leninizmus kérdései ( Budapest: Szikra, 1953), 410-411.
8.
See, for example, György Lukács, "On the Cultural Problems of Hungarian Democracy," Szabad Nép, 2 April 1946; Béla Fogarasi, "Debate on Hungary's Cultural Reconstruction," Köznevelés, 3, no. 1-2 ( 1947): 16. See also Károly Vígh, "The Organic Ills of Our Scientific Life," Tovább, 18 July 1947, 8, suggesting the establishment of a planning committee for culture, higher education, and science, with mandates to coordinate the three-year plans of the various scientific institutions.
9.
"A Magyar Tudomá?nyos Tanács 1949. évi munkatervének általános iráyelvei (General Directives for the Operative Plan for 1949 of the Hungarian Council of Science)", papers of the Hungarian Council of Science, MTT 4/2, in the Archives of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, n.d.
10.
Loren R. Graham, The Soviet Academy of Sciences and the Communist Party, 1927-1932 ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1967), viii.

-297-

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