Schooling for Success: Preventing Repetition and Dropout in Latin American Primary Schools

By Laura Randall; Joan B. Anderson | Go to book overview

almost meaningless to devote economic efforts to compensatory and preventive measures within the school system with that purpose in mind.

There is a great contradiction in claiming equal educational opportunities for everybody, on the one hand ( Ministry of Education, for instance), and adopting a severely restricted economic plan affecting mostly the poorest sectors of the population, on the other. This is the case for the time being in Argentina, with the highest historical rate of unemployment and the precarious and unstable working situation of a vast sector of the lower strata of the population.

The preventive plans against repetition and dropout that have been presented in this chapter must be considered in the light of this unfavorable socioeconomic frame for the popular sectors that suffer poverty in Argentina. Of course, it must be admitted that with no preventive or compensatory plan at all the situation would be worse. Economic inequality creates or magnifies the problem, and any kind of preventive or compensatory plan may be too weak to counterbalance the unfavourable situation.

There is not enough room in this chapter to present, even in a brief overview, the provincial initiatives dealing with the prevention of repetition and dropout. Only a few of them will be mentioned in the following lines. Some provinces have paid more attention, by means of special programs, to the teaching and learning processes of initial reading and writing. In some instances, specific surveys and research studies have been developed to obtain more rigorous information about the incidence of repetition and dropout in certain schools in order to identify those children who are at risk of school failure.


Note
1.
Greater Buenos Aires is the adjacent area around the Metropolitan area that, although it is not physically separated, forms part of the provincial territory of the Province of Buenos Aires. The largest province of Argentina bears the same name of the capital city. So, Province of Buenos Aires and Federal District of Buenos Aires (City of Buenos Aires) are distinguishable in terms of the political division of the country. Greater Buenos Aires includes the City of Buenos Aires, which is also known as the Federal District of Buenos Aires and also a part of the province of the same name.

References

Agudo de C. Córsico, and M. Manacorda de Rosetti. 1994. Interacción lingüistica entre maestros y alumnos y su influencia sobre el rendimiento escolar. Buenos Aires: A-Z.

Argentina. Ministenio de Cultura y Educación. Secretaria de Programación y Evaluación Educativa. 1993. Marco General del Sistema de Evaluación de la Calidad. Documento de Trabajo No 1.

-----. 1995. El Financiamiento Educativo Argentino en un Contexto de Restricción de Recursos, by A. Morduchowicz. Buenos Aires: Ministerio de Cultura y Educación.

Argentina. Ministerio de Cultura y Educación. 1996. Censo Nacional de Docentes y Establecimientos Educativos 94. Buenos Aires: Ministerio de Cultura. y Educación.

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