Schooling for Success: Preventing Repetition and Dropout in Latin American Primary Schools

By Laura Randall; Joan B. Anderson | Go to book overview
for teachers in P.900 schools was the "development of a newspaper about school life." This activity made it possible to develop knowledge in diverse areas. It was necessary to make calculations of costs and measurement of paper (arithmetic and geometry); to discuss and reach agreement about topics, news, and information that would be considered for the newspaper, (knowing how to listen, respect other opinions, tolerate, decide as a group -- civic education and values); to interview; edit commentaries and news; invent jokes (language, spelling), and to find interrelationships, since they could not create the newspaper if they did not integrate these different areas of knowledge.

In recent years there has been an increase in learning guides, a type of educational material that has begun to be developed and has awakened interest of teachers (Schiefelbein et al. 1993). The guides organize curriculum as a function of the teacher's aim and the children's interests and learning needs. The guides facilitate group work in the classroom and also, in some cases, the participation of the family at home, given that children and their families are invited to investigate aspects from daily life related to their family environment and cultural tradition.

The development of guides encourages the teachers' redesign of the curriculum and introduces elements of belonging and relevance for students' learning. The guides are an inexpensive teaching resource that stimulates teachers' creativity and motivates students. Nevertheless, their implementation demands time for work and coordination from the teachers in order that they be adopted as a permanent teaching resource in the school. In this respect, it would be interesting to investigate the requirements of teaching time and space for this kind of material to be incorporated into systematic classroom practice. Experience shows that the guides allow the teacher to retake his real place as generator of knowledge, of evaluator and facilitator of learning.


Conclusion

This chapter has sought to underscore the relevance of alternative non-formal education materials which enhance as much as or even more than textbooks, the stimulation of fundamental learning. Policy decision makers should consider the importance of these materials, especially as a strategy to develop independent reflection by classroom teachers.


Bibliography

Álvarez, F., C. Cardemil, B. Icaza, and L. Mayorga. 1995. "Familia y centros educativos." Santiago, Chile: Teleduc U.C.

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Schooling for Success: Preventing Repetition and Dropout in Latin American Primary Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Graphs ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part I - Introduction and Overview 1
  • References 22
  • Notes 31
  • References 31
  • References 42
  • Note 50
  • General References 51
  • References 59
  • Part II - Basic Education Systems 61
  • Notes 73
  • General Bibliography 73
  • Notes 87
  • References 101
  • Notes 116
  • References 117
  • Part III - Repetition and Dropout: Measurement and Programs 119
  • Note 140
  • References 140
  • Notes 150
  • References 150
  • Notes 161
  • References 161
  • Bibliography 174
  • Part IV - Decentralization 177
  • Bibliography 199
  • General References 209
  • Notes 225
  • General References 226
  • Part V - Curriculum 227
  • Bibliography 244
  • Bibliography 255
  • Part VI - Teaching Conditions: Training and Salaries 263
  • Notes 275
  • References 275
  • General References 289
  • Note 299
  • General References 300
  • Notes 307
  • Biblography 307
  • Part VII - Conclusion 309
  • About the Editors and Contributors 317
  • Index 325
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