Schooling for Success: Preventing Repetition and Dropout in Latin American Primary Schools

By Laura Randall; Joan B. Anderson | Go to book overview
region. In effect, these guides do not have as a context a zone of Chile or the history of the country. They try to be materials that produce brotherhood among people, that do not speak of good international relations but that put them into practice. Thus, teachers have come from abroad to visit the nation, and joint action among teachers from the Southern Cone is planned for March 1998.
Some Conclusions About Teacher Training
Teachers' or educators' training schools provide a context in which these professionals can increase their preparation to carry out their teaching mission. Teachers' training schools include both those that use this name and those that do not.We refer to as "good educators" or "good professionals" those who, in their work with the students, are engaged in following these criteria:
1. Students learn. The students' skills do not remain limited to memorization and book knowledge; the students advance in knowledge, they apply knowledge, they establish a dialogue between daily life and books and between the outside world and their internal essence.
2. What they learn is fundamental.
3. They include all learning in the first knowledge that is growth in humanity.
4. All students learn. Certainly not all learn the same things in the same period of time, but all advance in learning to the extent to which their capacity to learn permits them and in response to the assistance that they receive in the school.
The experiences described above allow us to obtain some inferences, useful for any instance of training:
1. Those teachers who leave a training school without being good educators can acquire this qualification in work places that provide an opportunity to achieve this learning.
2. In training teachers, it first has to be decided if they will be trained in the best way possible in the existing school system or if they should be taught to construct a different school.
3. To train valuable teachers for the existing system, trainers who are knowledgeable and enthusiastic about the current school system are needed. To train teachers for a different school system, trainers who are knowledgeable and enthusiastic about this other type of school are needed.

Note
I thank Dr. Ernesto Schiefelbein for reading this document and for the many valuable suggestions he made for its organization, and Paulina Schiefelbein for her invaluable work on the profile of teacher training in Chile.

-299-

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Schooling for Success: Preventing Repetition and Dropout in Latin American Primary Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Graphs ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part I - Introduction and Overview 1
  • References 22
  • Notes 31
  • References 31
  • References 42
  • Note 50
  • General References 51
  • References 59
  • Part II - Basic Education Systems 61
  • Notes 73
  • General Bibliography 73
  • Notes 87
  • References 101
  • Notes 116
  • References 117
  • Part III - Repetition and Dropout: Measurement and Programs 119
  • Note 140
  • References 140
  • Notes 150
  • References 150
  • Notes 161
  • References 161
  • Bibliography 174
  • Part IV - Decentralization 177
  • Bibliography 199
  • General References 209
  • Notes 225
  • General References 226
  • Part V - Curriculum 227
  • Bibliography 244
  • Bibliography 255
  • Part VI - Teaching Conditions: Training and Salaries 263
  • Notes 275
  • References 275
  • General References 289
  • Note 299
  • General References 300
  • Notes 307
  • Biblography 307
  • Part VII - Conclusion 309
  • About the Editors and Contributors 317
  • Index 325
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