Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest

By S. Howard Patterson | Go to book overview
work to join the strike. It is lawful if free from coercion or intimidation. Strike breaking is apt to be accompanied by violence.Boycotts are organized refusals to purchase the goods or to use the materials of those employers who are hostile to organized labor. A primary boycott concerns only those who are parties to the dispute. A secondary boycott involves the general public and parties not directly involved in the dispute. Although primary boycotts have generally been regarded as legal, secondary boycotts have commonly been regarded as combinations in restraint of trade and as an unwarranted interference with interstate commerce.Strikes and boycotts are weapons of the employees, but injunctions have more frequently been used by employers in labor disputes. An injunction is an order from a court in equity to a particular individual or to various individuals to do certain things or to refrain from doing particular acts. The violator of an injunction may be punished summarily for contempt of court.The original purpose of the injunction was to afford immediate relief against a threatened loss of life or property until an adjudication of rights could be made. But the increased use of injunctions in labor disputes has been accompanied by the issuance of "blanket" injunctions and injunctions which restrain individuals from acts which are already specified as statutory offences and from acts which are in accordance with civic liberties and constitutional guarantees. Organized labor has bitterly criticized the use and the abuse of injunctions in labor disputes.Various attempts have been made to estimate in monetary terms the costs of strikes and other industrial disputes. This annual charge on industry is surely in the millions of dollars. Even more serious than these economic losses, however, are the social costs of industrial disputes, as represented by deeds of violence, acts of crime, and class hatred. The present chapter on industrial conflict will be followed by one on industrial peace, in which various methods of preventing and arbitrating industrial conflicts will be discussed.
Collateral Reading
ADAMS T. S. and SUMNER H. L., "Labor Problems", chap. 6.
BLOOMFIELD D., "Problems of Labor", pp. 269-272.
BLUM S., "Labor Economics", chap. 6.
BYE R. T. and HEWETT W. W., Applied Economics, chap. 7.
CARLTON F. T., "History and Problems of Organized Labor", chap. 7.
CATLIN W. B., "The Labor Problem", chap. 15.
COMMONS J. R. and ANDREWS J. B., "Principle of Labor Legislation", rev., pp. 110- 123, 1927.
FITCH J. A., "Causes of Industrial Unrest", chaps. 12 to 17, inc.
FURNISS E. S., "Labor Problems", chap. 12.
GOMPERS S., "Labor and the Employer", chap. 9.

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