Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest

By S. Howard Patterson | Go to book overview
The frequent failures of mediation and conciliation to prevent strikes and the suffering which they inflict on the general public have led to the advocacy of coercive measures. Compulsory investigation represents an impartial study of the causes of industrial unrest and a dissemination of these findings. An appeal is made to the weapon of public opinion.Compulsory arbitration would go ever farther, for it would make binding the award of the commission. However, it involves the existence of certain standards of justice in the matter of wages, hours of labor, and general working conditions, as well as wage boards for their codification and interpretation. Organized labor has opposed compulsory arbitration because of its denial of the right to strike and other weapons of collective bargaining.In New Zealand and Australia compulsory arbitration and wage boards have functioned successfully for a number of years. The experiment of compulsory arbitration was also tried in Kansas, but it was declared unconstitutional as a general principle.Compulsory investigation may or may not involve the postponement of the right to strike. This provision was embodied in the laws of Canada and Colorado, but this feature is absent from compulsory investigation in Great Britain and most American states.Joint industrial councils are meetings of representatives of employers and of organized labor for the formulation of trade agreements. These define the accepted conditions of labor in a particular industry for a particular time. Trade agreements are not contracts, although individuals may contract with reference to them. The trade agreements in certain industries, as for illustration in the needle industries, not only define the general standards which are to prevail but also contain provisions for the arbitration of industrial disputes and for the adjustment of individual grievances.
Collateral Reading
ADAMS T. S. and SUMNER H. L., "Labor Problems", chap. 8.
ATKINS W. E. and LASSWELL H. D., "Labor Attitudes and Problems", pp. 486-494.
BLOOMFIELD D., "Problems of Labor", pp. 272-301 and 349-413.
-----, "Modern Industrial Movements", pp. 87-115 and 169-243.
BLUM S., "Labor Economics", chaps. 11 and 12.
BYE R. T. and HEWETT W. W., "Applied Economics", chap. 8.
CARLTON F. T., "History and Problems of Organized Labor", chap. 10.
COMMONS. J. R., Editor, "Trade Unionism and Labor Problems", see. ser., chaps. 33, 35, and 40.
COMMONS J. R. and ANDREWS J. B., "Principles of Labor Legislation", rev., pp. 135- 187, 1927.
ESTE J. A., "The Labor Problem", chap. 22.
FAIRCHILD F. R., FURNISS E. S. and BUCK N. S., "Elementary Economics", vol. 2, chap. 54.
FURNISS E. S., "Labor Problems", chap. 13.

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