The Influence of Horace on the Chief English Poets of the Nineteenth Century

By Mary Rebecca Thayer | Go to book overview
Save to active project

ALFRED LORD TENNYSON

I. Unquestionable traces of Horace
1. As we have seen, Tennyson's acquaintance with Horace began early in his life; and it is appropriate that we should find in his first extant letter, written to his aunt, Marianne Fytche, when he was twelve years old, the following sentence:

'It [the word diffused in Samson Agonistes] has the same meaning
as "temere" in one of the Odes of Horace, Book the second:

Sic temere et rosa
Canos odorati capillos
,

of which this is a free translation: "Why lie we not at random, under the shade of the plantain (sub platano), having our hoary head perfumed with rose water?"

See Carm. 2. 11. 14-15.

2. Motto of Parnassus:

Exegi monumentum . . . . . .
Quod non . . . . . . . . .
Possit diruere . . . innumerabilis
Annorum series et fuga temporum
.

Horace.

See Carm. 3. 30. 1-5. Tennyson's poem shows no trace of the Horatian ode, however, unless it be the phrase 'flight of the Ages' (fuga temporum).

3. From Becket 5. 2:

And one [wife] an uxor pauperis Ibyci.

See Carm. 3. 15. 1.

4. From an undated letter to James Spedding:

'The birds must sing and the furze bloom for you and Fitzgerald
alone, par nobile fratrum.'

See Serm. 2. 3. 243.

5. From a letter-diary written from Glastonbury, August, 1854:

'I took shelter over Arimathaean Joseph's bones in the crypt of
his chapel, for they say (credat Iudaeus) he lies there.'

See Serm. 1. 5. 100.

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Influence of Horace on the Chief English Poets of the Nineteenth Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 120

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?