The Psychology of Adaptation to Absurdity: Tactics of Make-Believe

By Rhoda L. Fisher; Seymour Fisher | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
10
SOMATIC CONSEQUENCES OF ILLUSIONS

If one goes beyond Cartesian notions, it is evident that, even though we label certain ideas as illusory, they exist in central nervous system tissue and therefore have physiological consequences. No one questions that fantasies and images influence the somatic realm. One only has to consider the commonplace example of how merely thinking about food initiates salivation and gastric mobility. However, despite the obvious connection between fantasy and bodily processes, little attention has been devoted directly to how illusion registers physiologically. True, there have been scattered studies of the impact of illusory ideas implanted by means of hypnosis upon sensory, motor, and autonomic functions (e.g., Kihlstrom, 1985; McGlashan, Evans, & Orne, 1969), and they documented significant effects. Also, various studies have pointed up the potential power of imagination to target specific channels of physiological response (e.g., Cacioppo & Petty, 1983). Becoming anxious about an imagined ("unreal") threat has physiological consequences quite analogous to those evoked by a "real" threat. While it may be apparent that illusory images reverberate in body terms, it is worthwhile to provide some detailed illustrations of such reverberation. Indeed, it can be suggested that ideational paradigms constructed of the illusory stuff of fantasy may shape unique modes of physiological representation.

The best examples of illusion's role in body response come from instances in which individuals are asked to take into their bodies substances to which they falsely ascribe potent properties. Let us begin with a really surprising report by Briddell et al. ( 1978). They were interested in exploring the effects of cognitive and pharmacological factors, linked with alcohol consumption, on sexual arousal to sexual stimuli differing in amount of deviance. Forty-

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psychology of Adaptation to Absurdity: Tactics of Make-Believe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 237

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.