West African Trade: A Study of Competition, Oligopoly and Monopoly in a Changing Economy

By P. T. Bauer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
SHARES OF RACIAL GROUPS AND OF FIRMS IN THE IMPORT TRADE

1. SHARES OF RACIAL GROUPS IN DIRECT IMPORTING

In West Africa the first stage in the import trade, that is, direct importing, is largely in non-African hands. From information extracted by the Department of Statistics in Nigeria from customs records it appears that in 1949 about 85% of the import trade of that country was handled by European firms, about 10% by Levantine and Indian firms, and about 5% by African firms. Since then the African share has probably increased slightly, partly as a result of preferential treatment in the allocation of import licences in the commodities affected by specific licensing.

The information available for the Gold Coast is less comprehensive than for Nigeria, but as will be suggested subsequently in this chapter it is sufficient to show that the general pattern of the participation of different groups in the import trade is similar to that in Nigeria. The share of African traders is probably somewhat larger as a result of more marked discrimination in their favour in the administration of import licensing. But as in recent years (especially in 1949 and 1950) specific licensing covered only a comparatively small part of all imports it did not affect the general picture greatly. It is probable that if the statistics for the Gold Coast were available in the same detail as for Nigeria they would show a somewhat larger proportion of importing in Indian and Levantine hands.


2. PROBLEMS OF PRESENTATION OF THE SHARES OF FIRMS IN THE TRADE IN IMPORTED MERCHANDISE

Africans frequently maintain that their small participation in direct importing proves that the import trade is in the nature of a monopoly. This is misleading, since a trade can be highly competitive even if all the traders are members of the same expatriate community. In the West African import trade there is in fact a substantial measure of concentration,1 a large share of the trade being handled by a small number of firms. In view of the political and social importance of this question it seems Worth while to investigate the degree of concentration

____________________
1
Which, however, does not necessarily indicate or measure monopoly power; cf. Chapter 7 below.

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
West African Trade: A Study of Competition, Oligopoly and Monopoly in a Changing Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.