West African Trade: A Study of Competition, Oligopoly and Monopoly in a Changing Economy

By P. T. Bauer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13
FURTHER INFLUENCES OF OFFICIAL POLICY ON THE TRADING SITUATION

1. COMPARATIVE IRRELEVANCE OF PRESENT IMPORT AND EXPORT CONTROLS TO THE RELATIVE POSITION OF THE NON-AFRICAN (EXPATRIATE) MERCHANT FIRMS

The operation of import licensing and exchange control in West Africa does not at present significantly affect the competitive position of the various trading firms in West Africa; it cannot be said to offer substantial advantages to the large firms.1 With the exception of certain specified commodities, imports from the sterling area are admitted under open general licence, that is, they can be imported without restrictions on source, quantity or importer. The principal exceptions are sugar, flour, oils and fats, tinned meats and petroleum products. In most cases the reason for these exceptions is that the sterling area is on balance a net importer from dollar sources; in one or two instances the shortage in the United Kingdom is a principal or a contributory factor. Much the same controls apply to imports from soft currency sources outside the sterling area; with the exceptions just listed, they are admitted practically freely.2

Imports of all commodities from hard currency sources, as well as the import of certain commodities from other sources, are subject to specific controls (specific licences). At present, therefore, import controls or exchange controls substantially affect only American and Japanese goods, as well as flour, sugar, petroleum products, tinned meats and oils and fats from all sources. In 1949-50 these restrictions affected sources and commodities which in a reasonably prosperous pre-war year represented about 20-25% of West African imports; as a result of relaxations in 1950 the corresponding proportion in the second half of that year was about 15-20%. This applies to the pre-war pattern of the import trade; with free importation the proportion of imports from these sources in recent years might have been higher.

____________________
1
This chapter describes the operation of import and price controls in force in 1950. The range of import controls was extended in 1952 as a result of the deterioration of the foreign exchange position of the sterling area in the previous year. But these changes did not influence those aspects of the controls relevant to the discussion of this chapter. The relative competitive position of the different expatriate firms, and the discrimination in favour of Africans in the administration of licensing remained substantially unaffected.
2
For technical reasons the terminology of the import licensing procedure differs from that applied to sterling area sources.

-172-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
West African Trade: A Study of Competition, Oligopoly and Monopoly in a Changing Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.